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100s and 1000s in mission mobilisation (Issue 31)

By Mike Robb (NZCMS Personnel Team) 

Hanging on the wall of my house is a small framed picture of those little ‘100s and 1000s’ sprinkles you put on ice-cream. At the top we’ve written “Train 100s to win 1000s.” This was a word God gave Ruth and I about 25 years through a preacher and it’s become the measure we’ve used to evaluate all major decisions since then. Regardless if its involvement in overseas missions, in the local church or in ‘secular’ work places, we ask ourselves whether it’s an opportunity to influence and equip and mobilise others for the furthering of God’s Kingdom. In other words, does it take us closer or further from training 100s to win 1000s? 

‘Mobilisation’ is a word that’s being thrown about in many mission and church circles. All of a sudden it seems we’ve all woken up to the fact that if we don’t mobilise for mission – if we’re not recruiting and equipping and training people – then there won’t be anyone engaging in mission at all! Future generations’ participation in mission depends on us taking mobilisation seriously today.

When the default setting is broke

The main places where the vast majority of Christians live, work and serve are outside the walls of the local church, not within them. Sadly, when we think about serving God, we often have a ’default setting’ that limits ministry to what happens within the church. If you want to serve God, your church offers plenty of options: become a children’s church teacher, a door greeter, a musician, a youth leader, even a preacher. These are all great and necessary, but it’s a very narrow view of what serving God looks like. When someone says they’re “called into ministry” they’re almost certainly talking about either pastoral ministry or overseas missions – it’s just our default way of seeing ministry and calling! But why couldn’t we have people say “God’s called me to medicine” or “God’s called me to be the world’s best postie.”  

I don’t think this ‘narrow view’ is represented by Scripture. As a simple example, look at John the Baptist. “He went into all the country around the Jordan, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. … ‘A voice of one calling in the wilderness, “Prepare the way for the Lord...”’” (Luke 3:3-4). 

“Into all the country… One calling in the wilderness.” That doesn’t sound like preaching in the temple or synagogues. Jesus too spent the vast majority of his time among the people: in houses, on the streets, at weddings and banquets, fishing at the lake. And we’re to follow in Jesus’ footsteps, taking the Gospel into the whole world (Matthew 28:18-20, Mark 16:15, Luke 24:46-49, Acts 1:8). “Into all the world” doesn’t sound like going just to the temple, synagogue or church does it?

Your local church is supposed to be the place where all believers are developed and equipped for ministry outside of the church. That’s because most Christians’ primary spheres of influence are in their schools, work places, clubs, communities and neighbourhoods. In fact, in order to reach the lost and build up the church, the ministry of most Christians must be performed outside the local church. Otherwise the local church becomes more like a residential care facility, where the staff look after the members and simply keep them happy. That’s not the vision of Church presented by the New Testament! 

More than seat warmers

Turning back to mobilisation, what if the primary role of the leaders of a local church was to care for and train, prepare and release Christians to be serving in whatever context God has them in? What might happen? What if attending the local church was more a means to a greater end, rather than just being the goal of our Christian faith? 

I’m convinced there’s more in God’s Kingdom for each of us than to just keep a seat warm once a week! What if the nurturing and equipping we received from our local church on a Sunday was to resource and encourage us for the week ahead, where we’ll spend much of our time with others who don’t know Christ? It was these environments that Jesus expected these following words to be applied, not in the local church:
“Let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven” (Matthew 5:14). 

So how do we move from seeing ministry as what happens in church to it being all about what happens beyond the stained glass windows? People’s giftings and desires need to be explored, evaluated, and possibly most importantly, given opportunities for expression. (From everything we can take away from 1 Corinthians 12-14, one main lesson is that Church and ministry are supposed to be something we all get to participate in.) Leadership of our churches may need to release people, provide training opportunities and nurture a culture of permission giving. Where else will the saints learn how to minister if not within the church?!

Could this get messy, and could some mistakes or disasters happen? Almost certainly! But are we willing to pursue mobilisation anyway? Do we really want to “Go into all the world”? 

NZCMS is all about ‘Making Mission the Centre’ for EVERY follower of Jesus. We want to see all of God’s people mobilised for local and global mission – which includes sending people overseas but involves so much more than that! Talk to us about how we can support you in your mobilisation efforts by emailing office@nzcms.org.nz 

For discussion

What’s the difference between seeing yourself as a seat-warmer and seeing yourself as a minister wherever God has placed you?

What can you, your group and your church be doing to equip people for ministry outside of the church? Are their opportunities for you to be equipped as well?

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Exploring today's missional issues from a variety of angles, each edition of the Intermission magazine will equip you and your group to engage with God in your community and beyond. To signup to receive the Intermission in the post, email office@nzcms.org.nz. Intermission articles can also be found online at nzcms.org.nz/intermission.