January 2017

It begins – New Health Center 1.0

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Narrow road, burnt grass, full load. We breathed a sigh of relief as our small pickup  arrived at Cet Kana, laden with all things required to start a new health clinic. The place is gorgeous, with one of the better views in Gulu overlooking thousands of palm trees on an open, sparsely populated plain. The clinic is next to the current and future church. Current is a skeleton of palm tree timbers, covered every Sunday with tarpaulins. Future is the brick building, with half-walls only.

We were a bit shocked to find that the rooms hadn’t been opened for months. After thirty minutes of sweeping and rearranging, Felix our nurse, and Fiona our assistant co-ordinator unpacked the drugs and equipment. Desks and chairs were moved into the clinic room. The blood pressure machine was unboxed. Within a couple of hours, two dusty unused rooms had been transformed into a nice wee health clinic.

There are two big advantages to the health clinic location.

The church owns the building so we don’t pay rent The Pastor and other church members have already been involved in weekly family planning clinics run from the building, so the church/health connection is already rolling.

But we are yet to see whether this will fly. Are there enough people in the area to justify a clinic (my biggest concern)? Can adults afford the 2500 Ugandan shillings (1 New Zealand dollar) we are asking to treat a child? Or the 5000 shillings (you do the math) to treat an adult? Can our nurse juggle the responsibilities of organising the facility, seeing patients and managing the money? After 3 months we’ll have some idea. After 6 months we’ll make the decision whether to continue or not. Taking a risk like this isn’t easy on the nerves, as it’s a big money and time investment. I keep reminding myself that even if the clinic “fails” to become sustainable, we still will have treated around 1000 patients more efficiently than most NGOs could manage. I also can’t help thinking that Jesus is into this kind of risk.

And its exciting. Seeing the first child handed over to nurse Felix to test for malaria was a small victory in itself. I’ll keep you updated with how things are tracking.

We are starting up 3 clinics like this with money already raised, and are aiming to start 2 more. If you’re keen to donate money towards starting the last 2, then message me at ugandapanda.com/contact-us/

A huge thanks to those of you in New Zealand, Australia and beyond who made this possible. You know who you are.

State of the World 2016

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In this video Jason Mandryk and Molly Wall, editors of Operation World, give insight to key issues in the church, the Great Commission, and the world based on their extensive research and encounters around the world.

‘These are tumultuous times. Change in every sphere of life seems to be accelerating. What really is happening in the world? And how does this relate to the staggering scale, complexity, and urgency of the Great Commission?’

During this session of the Launsanne Movement’s Younger Leader’s Gathering, participants were asked to listen to the groans of the world and to how the Holy Spirit might be speaking specifically to their context.

This presentation was given at the third Lausanne Younger Leaders Gathering (YLG2016) held in Jakarta, Indonesia, from 3-10 August 2016.

Download the presentation and the accompanying notes

Saving a life, or two

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Our wonderful midwife Gloria ‘in the bush’ at Oberabic Health Centre had a hard night recently. She’s the only midwife there, so has to do most the work that involves mothers and babies, and make all the calls under really difficult circumstances. A miscarriage and a tricky delivery led to a long, intense evening which ended up really well for the mothers and newborn baby. Its hard to overstate what a fantastic job she did under the circumstances.

Apart from being a great story, and example of the great work that goes on at our health centres, this story is a microcosm of the struggles our patients and staff face all the time. Amongst other things Gloria and the patient faced these challenges. Feel free to add your own after watching the video.

The Patients: – No access to transport to get to a higher level facility – Poor knowledge of problems around birth, which led to the mother coming in late and not telling Gloria her waters had broke. – Lack of social support

Gloria – Working in the uncomfortable zone above your level of medical expertise – Having to do everything yourself (sterilise the equipment yourself, after you’ve already completed the delivery) – Understaffing