Jairus Robb

Whanau on mission

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We asked some families how they’ve taught their children to be missional. Kesh and his family moved to Christchurch in 2017. He is studying a Masters in Social Work and attends the Presbyterian Church where his wife, Esther, is an ordained Minister. To the Sabey family, mission is simply shining God’s light through our words and actions. While we have always encouraged our children to share their faith verbally, we place more emphasis on living in a way that attracts others to the light of Christ.Here are some practical ways in which our family aims to be missional:Share Christ with your actions: Being kind, helpful, sharing a smile, encouraging others, playing with a lonely child at school and standing up to bullies are not just ‘good deeds’. They are powerful ways in which others are attracted to the “different” in us. Be natural when talking about your faith: Look for natural conversations and circumstances to share the Good News. Try to avoid churchy jargon and religious lingo that an unchurched, primary-aged child would not understand. Simply put,“Don’t be weird”.Don’t be discouraged when you don’t see any fruit: Being patient with those we are influencing is a powerful fruit of the Spirit. Every sincere, Christ-like word or action we share with others is a seed which has the potential to sprout in due season. The “due season” may be tomorrow or twenty years away. Listen first: In a culture where everyone wants to “have their say”, there are a great number of people who simply want to be heard, understood and accepted.Simply listening and empathising, rather than leaping to provide answers, makes others feel cared for. When someone feels cared for, they will take you and your message seriously.We hope that you find these tips helpful. We will leave you with a little “Sabeyism” we say to our kids before they leave for school: “Be kind, be respectful and shine like a light!!”

Introducing Hannah

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Kia Ora!

My journey towards overseas mission began as a child when my family and I visited an Operation Mobilisation ship that was moored near to where we lived. After looking around the ship and hearing about life on board from people working there, I told my mum “When I grow up I would like to be a missionary!”  

I first visited Fiji in 2015.  As I visited villages and special needs schools I began praying and exploring the possibility of doing a short term mission assignment.  I’d just completed my degree in Early Childhood but I knew I would have to work two years in an early childhood setting in order to get my registration. During this time, I have continued to feel the passion for overseas mission, and to explore where my experience as an Early Childhood Teacher could be used overseas. Earlier this year I approached NZCMS with a view to them supporting my desire to do short term work in a Kindergarten in Fiji.

Since beginning my journey with NZCMS I’ve felt a peace which I believe is a real confirmation that God is calling me to serve in Fiji.  They’ve provided me with the logistical, spiritual and personal support needed to take the next step in serving God on mission overseas. Therefore, from January 2019, I’ll be partnering with NZCMS as an intern volunteering as an early childhood teacher at St Christopher’s Kindergarten in Suva. As I prepare for this new season please pray for:

A continued sense of God’s call and peace as my time overseas gets closer A sense of his peace and presence as I settle into a new country and a new role And the knowledge and assurance that God is with me

Hannah Gennard

A way to pray: November

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I wonder how we’re meant to pray when there are so many distractions around us. In fact I even find my own brain a distraction. Jesus tells us to go into a room and close the door. But my mind starts to fill up the hole left by the lack of external noise straight away. It stays “When is that movie on? What was that noise? How did that stain get on my shirt?” Honestly, it’s ridiculous what it will come up with. I often find that it’s so important to actually find something that focuses your mind on becoming aware of God’s presence. Something that brings our mind under control. Because, in a way, it’s only when you imprison the chatter of your mind that you actually become free to hear from God.    My favourite band, twenty one pilots, says this in one of their songs. “…Tie a noose around your mind, loose enough to breath fine and tie it to a tree. Tell it, you belong to me, this ain’t a noose, this is a leash and I have news for you, you must obey me.” I encourage you to do what the lyric suggests. Before going through the prayer prompts, spend three minutes doing something that entraps your mind into focusing entirely on God. Read a verse of scripture out loud. Sing a line from a hymn. Find a poem. Keep it simple. Let’s pray.

A way to pray

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“This then is how you should pray:

Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation but deliver us from the evil one.” (Matthew 6:9-13)

I think it’s so powerful this prayer. It seems likes Jesus didn’t separate his prayer life with God from the will of God. I often think of my “re-charging and connection time” with God as quiet, prayerful reflections. And certainly there are times for that! But what if prayer could be so closely entwined with our being obedient to God, that doing God’s will and seeing his power transforming this would is just as re-charging and connecting as our quiet times?

I’m reminded of John 4, where Jesus is speaking with the woman at the well. After she leaves, Jesus’ disciples tell him he should eat something. And Jesus replies “My food is to do the will of him who sent me and to finish his work.” Wow. Isn’t that a powerful statement. Jesus was so connected with his heavenly father that doing his will was his source of ultimate fulfillment and nourishment.

What if prayerful and spiritual fulfillment didn’t just encompass our quiet times with the Lord but included the times that we were serving others? Acting. Doing. Knowing we are being replenished by acting in the authority and power of the God.

Let’s pray.

Monica Meadowcroft remembered

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Last week, we sadly announced that Monica Meadowcroft had passed away. She passed on September 22 and her funeral was held on September 26. Monica was a NZCMS Mission Partner, council member and life long member of NZCMS. Below is a tribute written by her son Tim Meadowcroft, which we would like to share with you and the wider NZCMS family. Please pray with us for the Meadowcroft family during this time.

Our mother, Monica Meadowcroft, died on 22 September 2018 aged 91. She was born Monica Morris in 1927 in Wantage in the south of England, where her father was teaching at King Alfred College. The family came to New Zealand when Mum was three, for her father to take up a post as head of maths at Christs College. He held this post till his retirement. So much of Mum’s upbringing revolved around Christs College and the house in Watford Street, Papanui.

She attended Christchurch Girls High and is remembered to have had lunch regularly with a group of friends on the roof of the old school in Cranmer Square. During this period she was influenced to faith by, among others, Alison Moore who later married Ken Dalley and served with him in medical mission with NZCMS in East Africa. She attended a strong young people’s ministry at St James, Lower Riccarton in the 1940s. She met Dad, who had come down from Nelson to university in Canterbury while washing dishes in the vicarage after evening services and then walking home with him through Hagley Park. The washing of dishes seems to have been deployed as a courtship device in such circles.

Mum completed a BSc in Maths and subsequently taught maths and science briefly at St Margaret’s College. She continued to get to know Dad in the context of the Evangelical Union and the ministry of Roger Thompson at St Martins, Spreydon. They walked home from the evening Bible Studies at St Martin’s also; they seemed to walk home a lot and were still doing it 70 years later, 66 of which were as a married couple.

During these years, the late 1940s, Mum and Dad were part of a flowering of Anglican mission interest amongst young people that would fuel NZCMS for the next generation. They were both active in the League of Youth. A number of people from those years remained close friends. Those years also included being associated with the maturing influence of older returned servicemen students in immediate postwar years. Pakistan was a focus during this period, and Mum, independently of her relationship with Dad, was developing a keen interest in work in India.

After a brief period teaching at Christs College after university, Dad was ordained in 1951 into the Nelson Diocese and posted to Greymouth as curate. He was required to board with the vicar and his mother, and this was not much fun at all. In the meantime, Mum and Dad maintained their courtship by utilising the midnight railcar between Greymouth and Christchurch. Due to his difficult accommodation circumstances, Dad lobbied vigorously for permission to marry before the end of the curacy. He got the dispensation, so Mum married Dad in August 1952, and I arrived in rapid but respectable time.

In their wedding photos, Dad is wearing one of those big old-fashioned clerical collars. It was clear that in marrying Dad, Mum was signing on to her own vocation as ministry in support of Dad’s ordained ministry. This she carried out with great panache and intent. We remember growing up in a hospitable environment, sometimes, from a child’s perspective, annoyingly so. It was a model of generous living. This hospitality continued through the entire period of active ministry.

After a spell working with Dad in Seddon parish, Mum set off with him and a young child by ship to England, round the Horn and through the Panama Canal due to the Suez crisis of 1956. A formative time at Liskeard Lodge in Kent, including regular teaching from Max Warren, was followed by sailing for Pakistan in early 1957. The time in England was a chance for Mum to connect with what she grew up thinking of as “home,” as many New Zealanders of the time did.

We most recently have seen in Mum, a frail old lady. I see a young woman heading off to the unknown with a small child in the days when communications were distant. I see her giving birth to twins in a small clinic up in the Murree Hills, not having previously known she was carrying twins, Michael and Kathy. I see her losing our sister Lucy at several hours old in 1963 and burying her in Sialkot. From that period she was comforted by a verse from Proverbs that hung on her wall for many years: “The blessing of the Lord it maketh rich, and he addeth no sorrow with it.” I see her coping for weeks on end with three children on her own as the patterns of mission life required regular separations from Dad. I see her making a home wherever she found herself. I see her sending her children away to boarding school for six months a year when communication was no more than a weekly letter (written under duress by one party). I see her working as a research lab technician to put Dad through a degree in Princeton. I see her travelling internationally with young children and negotiating the complexities of arrivals and departures in foreign ports. And I remember her being unable to return home when her mother was killed in a road accident in 1974. She spent some hours running around the Murree hillside searching for a working telephone to ring home. Again, such were communications in those days. And of course amongst all this were the many joys of international relationships sustained over the years.

After a term in Karachi on the first arrival in Pakistan, the 14 years at Gujranwala Theological Seminary in Punjab were the centrepiece of both Mum and Dad’s ministry during their time in Pakistan, up to 1975. During those years Mum’s gifts of administration and hospitality flourished. She was on the board of Murree Christian School for a period. Her home was well organised and hospitable, and she was involved in manifold ways in the life of the seminary, from bookkeeping to dispensary work to literacy training to family planning campaigning. These were years of great challenge and significant achievement in ministry; all were supported and enabled by Mum.

From their time in parish ministry back in New Zealand, many can attest to Mum’s focus on making the vicarage a centre of parish life, first in Papanui and then St Matthews, Dunedin. Ministry in both parishes was marked by the development of active groups of young adults into faith and leadership, enabled in no small measure by Mum’s ministry of hospitality and open home. Both were busy parishes, and especially in Dunedin included a strong student focus.

Mum with Dad continued to maintain a strong commitment to NZCMS. Mum spent some years as a member of the council, and she was made a life member of the Society.

Mum loved the caravan and trips to Hanmer and earlier to Waikouaiti out of Dunedin. The years of retirement at Wyn Street in Hoon Hay and then in the villa at Santa Maria/Thorrington Village enabled Mum to express her love of gardening and pets. She became active in St Andrews and St Nicholas.

Mum had a simple, unquestioning faith, which helped to ground those around her. A strong and determined person, she became a leader in places where she has found herself. According to Dad, “she became the leader of every group to which she has ever belonged.” This meant of course that she could occasionally be known to be quite formidable. Yet, for all that, she lived in service of others.

In recent times, Mum has become increasingly confined, and Dad has cared assiduously and lovingly for her. We are grateful for the staff at Thorrington Village for their care of Mum and flexibility with us as a family. The evident distress of so many staff at Mum’s passing is a testimony both to Mum and to their own caring of her, for both of which we are grateful. Mum’s was a life well-lived.

After she died, I found a small book of love poems which had been given to her by Dad. It was marked at Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s poem, “If Thou Must Love Me.” It opens with the line, “If thou must love me, let it be for naught / Except for love’s sake only.” Our mother both received and gave that kind of love for seventy years with Dad. And we who have been produced by and come within the orbit of that love have been blessed.

 

 

Lord of Heavenly armies (Intermission – Issue 36)

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As I was reading tonight, the title ‘Lord of Heavenly Armies’ struck me afresh. The idea that God is the commander of the hosts is unique in that it brings a military element in. Armies are regimented, disciplined, and vast. Their commanders move them with precision and purpose, to accomplish a determined result. I know this title also refers to angel armies and that thought alone is intriguing. But what about us as part of an army?.“I’m in the Lord’s Army” – as the old Sunday school song goes. And of course, back in the day, we all got to make shields and helmets of salvation and swords. Ah, swords. Yes! I like swords. But here-in lies the problem. We’re not using our swords. We’re not disciplined. We’re not aware of the warfare we are in!

The tools of the enemy

In our New Zealand context, I would have to say the most effective strategy of the enemy is distraction. A young mum shared her dismay with me recently:; “Sue, I got up, I could find my cell phone, I could find my gym shoes, I could find the kid’s uniforms, but I couldn’t find my Bible. What does that say? I’m too busy!” Her insight and accountability to the small group of friends gathered for their regular prayer and catch-up were enough to inspire her to change.

Yes, it takes discipline to be in the Lord’s Army and it is such hard work to keep our priorities right. For myself as a mother and a leader, my first and constant battle is always to plan those ‘pray, work and rest’ rhythms so I can model a lifestyle of joy and liberty to my non-Christian friends and church community. We don’t want to be saying, “Come to Jesus and be a stressed out unit with no capacity for fun,” do we? No, we don’t! We want to be a ‘led’ and not a ‘driven’ people.

People are clear in their minds they want to be about building up God’s household and creating spaces for God to turn up but they get overwhelmed and then very quickly discouraged, consumed with negative thoughts and guilt about the kind of Christian they should, ought, could, or must be. And it’s downhill from there. They fall into condemnation and then it all gets a bit much and they we just give up.

This nasty condemnation manages to keep itself entrenched because we have this tendency to compare ourselves to others, always unfavourably. A good example is a very bright and reasonably successful man who was depressed and told his counsellor he thought it was because he hadn’t done as well as his room-mate at university. It turned out his room-mate was Elon Musk, who would later be ranked 21st on the Forbes list of The World’s Most Powerful People and listed as the 53rd richest person in the world. His counsellor has a great adage, “Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today.” My adage is “‘What does God say about you?”

How we can fight back

We need constant encouragements to remind us about the reality of the story we belong to. Those of us who are mothers and fathers in the faith need to be much more intentional about speaking out words of affirmation and praise as we notice hearts wrestling to do what is right. We live in a culture that is so full of put-downs and ‘she’ll be rights’. The challenge is to keep telling the whole story, so people really understand that every step of faith is priceless and worth fighting for.

“…(You) are birthed into an inheritance that will never perish, kept in heaven for you who through faith are shielded by God’s power. Although you face all kinds of trials these have come so your faith, of greater worth than gold, may result in glory and honour when Jesus Christ is revealed.” – (1 Peter 1:4-8).

We need to keep telling the whole story well, so that people understand whose and who they are. We need to help people understand the inheritance they have so they perceive God’s ultimate vision.

What we can learn from the stoncutters

I like the old story of the stonecutters who were asked by a traveler what they were doing. The first man continued his work and grumbled, “I am cutting stones.”

Realising that the stonecutter did not wish to engage in a conversation, the traveler moved toward the second man and repeated the question. To the traveler’s delight, this time the man stopped his work, ever so briefly, and bluntly stated that as soon as he had earned ten quid he was going to return home.

The traveller headed to the third man and asked again about his work.

This time the worker paused, glanced at the traveler until they made eye contact and then looked skyward, drawing the traveler’s eyes upward.

He replied, “I am a stonecutter and I am building a cathedral. I have journeyed many miles to be part of the team that is constructing this magnificent building. I have spent many months away from my family and I miss them dearly. However, I know how important this cathedral will be and I know many people will find sanctuary and solace here. I know this because the Bishop told me his vision for people to come from all parts to worship God. He also told me that the cathedral would not be completed in our days but that the future depends on our hard work. I know this is the right thing to do even though it is costly.”

Our choices, day to day

Our simple daily choosing to do the right thing has an eternal impact. Soldiers have courage, make sacrifices, and stand firm if they understand the objectives and if they understand the greater purpose they are fighting for. If we’re going to have any effect as Christians in this battle for souls, we need to believe God does indeed do what he promised and has in fact already determined the result.

Most importantly, resolve to stay the course and to listen moment by moment for the commands from the Captain of the Lord of Hosts. We must listen so we may live.

“Give ear and come to me; listen, that you may live. I will make an everlasting covenant with you, my faithful love promised to David.” – (Isaiah 55:3).

Sue is a Vicar at Sounds Anglican Parish.

This article is part of NZCMS’ quarterly magazine Intermission. Each article will be uploaded periodically and can be found online at nzcms.org.nz/intermission. Alternatively, to receive the physical copy, feel free to email us at office@nzcms.org.nz or call us on 03 377 2222. 

 

The Spiritual Battles, Here and Now (Intermission – Issue 36)

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The following stories are from those in New Zealand and all around the world who are aware of and have been fighting spiritual battles recently. Ephesians 6:12 says

“For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”

My purpose for collecting and sharing these stories is so that you become aware that this spiritual battle is very real. And I believe that God wants more of us to become aware of this so that we can begin to learn how to fight against “the spiritual forces of evil” for the extension of his Kingdom. 

Jonathan Hicks – CMS Mission Partner in Solomon Islands

“The Song”

Parents in Melanesia face lifelong liability for their children’s actions. Silas and Aiye’s son has a sexual addiction. Already in significant debt, the couple is broadsided by a series of compensation claims from families of several young women. One family threatens violence. Ashamed to ask their community to help them with their expenses, the parents are paralysed. Then Silas comes to our house telling us that Aiye has gone missing for a whole day. As evening sets in, we pray that God will bring her safely home.

After dark, she arrives at our house: “When I heard about my son this morning, my heart became like a stone. I wandered in the bush until evening. I came to a tall cliff. I stood there on the edge of it, imagining myself falling down. Then a bird flew over me and sang brightly. My heart felt something again. The light came in. I woke as if from sleep and walked home.” We had prayed with Silas fifteen minutes earlier. The place where she was standing? A fifteen-minute walk from the village.

“A Warrior Spirit”

Melanesian priests often begin their training with significant spiritual baggage. Sometimes they have invited evil spirits into their lives to give them more spiritual authority. Sometimes this was done for them at birth. In May 2018, the Lord made it clear to me and Andrew that we needed to confront his fellow student because he had a very powerful devil-spirit. The student was convicted by our message and agreed to meet at the school chapel to pray for deliverance.

During the deliverance, we realised we were confronting a warrior spirit that had caused the death of several people before. Surprisingly, this realisation caused absolutely no fear at all. As we prayed for him, I was aware only that we were being helped by the Prince of Peace. Andrew – who has a gift of discernment – said he saw a figure dressed in white standing above the two of us. The Lord answered our prayer and the evil spirit left our friend. When it had gone, the student did two things he had never done before. He wept – his wife of thirty years had never heard him do this – and he asked to be re-named. We anointed him and he received the name of a great priest-king from the Old Testament. 

 

Peter – Vicar in Christchurch at Halswell-Prebbleton parish and Archbishop’s Commissary

“A Story from Christchurch”

As a vicar or minister of the Gospel, you get called on to do some pretty strange things every now and then.

About a month ago, the Cathedral staff fielded a call from a man who was convinced his house was haunted. Strange things were happening, and he was hearing voices urging him to kill himself. More seriously, his adult son living with him had, in fact, attempted suicide. He wanted “the bishop” to come and exorcise his house. So in due course, Mark Barlow and I visited a state house on the east side of Christchurch.

Listening to his story, it would have been easy to dismiss it as schizophrenia or something similar – except  for one thing. He said that because he was so scared, he had called on the name of Jesus, and the voices and evil presences left him alone “but still hung around.” He was impressed and so started reading an old Gideon’s Bible he found.   While he was reading it, he was left in peace. Even more impressed, he started attending a church. His problem was he couldn’t keep speaking the name of Jesus, and he couldn’t read the Bible all day. He wanted the evil out of his house.

Mark and I went from room to room and in the name and authority of Jesus commanded whatever evil beings were in the room to leave. Then we asked the Lord to wash the room clean and blessed it with water. In the son’s room, we also prayed for the son’s recovery and prayed with the man himself. We led him to commit his life to Jesus, cast out the spirits that were in him and encouraged him to continue attending church and join a group where he could be discipled. The wonderful thing was that not only was the house a different place, but he was also a different person when we left – even his voice had changed. He was so grateful.

 

Katie – CMS Mission Partner in Spain

“The Neighbourhood”

The man entered the second-hand clothes shop regularly. We knew he was a witch because he had mentioned it before. There’s another man who walks past the shop with his hood up and clasping a symbolical necklace as he speaks words over the suburb. Yet another shop has opened close by that is full, like all the rest, of objects, bottles and cards that can be used to call on the spiritual world. A fellow painter in my art class talks about someone who can come and “clean” your house of spirits.  

In Europe, we too are in a spiritual battle from internal and overseas influences. Our deepest longing is that people can be set free from this oppressive spiritual bondage and know true freedom in Christ. So, we are moved to pray and to intercede.     

“And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people” (Ephesians 6:18).

 

Andy Miller – CMS Mission Partner in Costa Rica

“The Timing Was the Givaway…”

We have been in Costa Rica for two months now and we had been here a week when my wife Shona was admitted to hospital for five days with acute diverticulitis (you can Google it!). I know that we are in a fallen world and we can’t give the enemy credit for all sickness, however the timing was the giveaway.  

We started the day taking Shona for a doctor’s appointment at 9:30am as she had a sore stomach. Twelve hours later, after blood tests, ultra sound, more blood tests, a lot of waiting/ insurance negotiation and a CAT scan, she was finally given a bed at 9pm. Essentially, if you wanted to plan something that would be the most disruptive for our lives at this stage – this would be it! Plus, we have three children who felt very anxious as they are in a new country, new school, with a new language and Mummy is in hospital.  

As it happened, we decided to relax and trust in the Lord and enjoy spending time together. We hadn’t had a whole day together, child-free, since our wedding anniversary. It was a hard day. However, we decided not to be afraid or discouraged and spoke lovingly to each other. This whole experience with the ongoing tests has made us slow down and put each other and family first. As we put our trust in the Lord and reach out for prayer and help, then we see what the enemy intended for evil turned around for good and a testimony of his love and peace invading our circumstances. 

What is the Battle? (Intermission – Issue 36)

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The current issue of our Intermission magazine is about the ‘battle’ humanity finds itself in. The battle against spiritual evil. The battle against injustice. The battle against ourselves. There’s some pretty deep stuff in here.

You may be thinking to yourself, “Jairus, I don’t actually think I’m in a battle.” Well, whether you believe you’re in one or not, you’re bound to recognise that there’s something not quite ‘right’ with the world you live in. And there’s something not quite right with humanity either. With me. With you.

Paul wrote in Romans 7:15-16, “I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do.” How perfectly does this describe the battle raging within us and the world? The division of right and wrong, good and evil, truth and lies. Something is broken. And I believe it’s time we start recognising that God does not intend for it to stay that way. And, perhaps more importantly, he doesn’t mean for us to passively watch on either!

The kingdom of evil and the Kingdom of Heaven

This realm, this kingdom of brokenness and lies, is visible every day. It rules in the news, where we see what subjective, biased producers want us to see.

We see it in romance movies, where teenagers are taught that the most important things about a relationship are how physically attracted you are to the other and how they make you feel.

We see it in politics and bills that are passed, where men and women push forward policies, not based on the common good and the public majority, but upon their own personal agendas and vendettas.

This is not what God intends for our world to look like. This is not how God intends for us to act. So what do I think of when I imagine the Kingdom of God? And what could God be calling us to? What does this “Kingdom of Heaven” that his Son talked about so often look like?

Does it look like a marriage, in which the foundation of the relationship is not about how the couple makes each other feel, but about serving and strengthening each other so that they can better follow God?

Does it look like a news reporter who pursues truth and the authentic presentation of facts to the public, so that the leaders of our country are held accountable for their actions?

Does it look like a God-follower throwing himself or herself into the political realms so they can walk into the public spheres of our communities and, instead of yelling, “I have all the answers!” humbly ask, “What are the questions I should be asking?”

I’m sure you can agree that, when you imagine the Kingdom of Heaven, it looks entirely different to what we often experience. Or even how we ourselves tend to act.

So what now?

Brothers and sisters in Christ, I’m not writing this article just for the sake of it. I’m not trying to sound enthusiastic and passionate for fun. I am genuinely pleading with you to begin considering this question: “Am I happy about the current condition of the world?”

I, for one, feel my heart starting to beat a little bit faster when I ask myself that question. My imagination takes over, and I feel my faith beginning to grow and anger – yes anger – bubbling up as I come to realise how subtly and how effectively Satan has twisted things. Or how we’ve twisted them ourselves.

This article isn’t your typical Intermission piece in which I write a thousand words and ask you some questions to reflect on at the end. This article is meant to create a hunger within you for change. It’s supposed to remind you that God intends for us to do something about the brokenness and evil we see in this world. And it’s supposed to help you realise that first: we need to become aware of the enemy we are facing. And second: we need to devise some strategies so we can fight back. I’m sure that, without both of these working together, we will lack the power that God intends to give us.

In Matthew 10:16, Jesus says this:

“Look, I am sending you out like sheep among wolves; therefore be as shrewd as snakes and as innocent as doves.”

So how about it, fellow Christians? Will you be someone who walks through the evil and broken places of this world and overcomes and restores it into the image of the Kingdom of Heaven? Will you move as Jesus did through the shadows and call on God to fill them with light? Will you be a soldier in the battle for the Kingdom of Heaven? Because the enemy is out there. And God is continuously looking for someone who is willing to put up a fight.

Note from the Editor (Intermission – Issue 36)

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NZCMS publishes a magazine called Intermission four times a year. Among other things it addresses missions work from a variety of angles, inspiring and encouraging individuals, small groups and churches all over New Zealand. This month we will be publishing our 36th Issue titled “Are you prepared for battle?”

Harrison Ford says the following in a movie called “42”.

“Your enemy will be out in force and you cannot meet him on his own low ground.” The film is about Jackie Robinson, the first African American baseball player to play in an all-white team and an all-white league. It’s an incredible movie and it paints the picture of how brutal, vicious and conniving the ‘powers that be’ were in trying to stop Jackie from playing the sport he loved

But Ford’s character trains Jackie how to deal with his enemies’ attacks. He tells him to respond differently. Not react to a nasty comment with one of his own. Not to punch back when an opposing player strikes him. But to flip it. To change lanes. Switch gears. He taught him to come back at his opposition with something they couldn’t respond to.

In this issue of Intermission, we will be talking about spiritual warfare and the different fields of battle that this war takes place in. There are some serious topics here. But how often can we be drawn into the depths of seriousness? The muddy waters of sombreness and gloom? And yes, there is space for these feelings. Jesus never ignored them. But the key is that he never let them overwhelm him. When the enemy tried to force exaggerated gravity and despair upon him, he changed gears. He told a story. Made a joke. Shocked the crowd. Forced the devil into silence with something his enemy couldn’t respond to. Friends, we don’t meet our foe on his own low ground. 

That’s why we chose this particular front cover for this month’s issue of Intermission. It’s funny. It’s light. It’s quirky. And I believe when Nehemiah wrote, “The joy of the Lord is your strength!” he actually meant it. So, as we come to read the following articles in the coming weeks, let’s remember that our enemy Satan has no joy. And he certainly doesn’t know how to respond to laughter when he does everything he possibly can to get us to cry.

Below is the list of authors and that have written for us to explore this topic of ‘spiritual warfare’. I pray that they inspire, equip and empower you to go forward into the daily battles that you face with prayer, passion and perspective. Because the war is out there, but Jesus has promised that we will have the victory!

“I have told you these things so that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take courage; I have overcome the world!” – John 16:33.

 

 

Exploring today’s missional issues from a variety of angles and contexts, the Intermission publication will equip you and your group to engage with God in your community and beyond. 

Each Intermission article will be uploaded periodically and can be found online at nzcms.org.nz/intermission. Alternatively, to receive the physical copy, feel free to email us at office@nzcms.org.nz or call us on 03 377 2222.