Haerenga

Introducing Sam

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Kia Ora team.

Sam here, and I feel very privileged and excited to be a part of the NZCMS internship, heading over to Kenya and interning with Nairobi Chapel. I will be in Kenya for three months as I experience African culture and intern at the Nairobi Chapel Church. I will learn what it means to be an effective disciple of the Lord while being trained and taught in various areas of ministry.

I have lived in scarfie land (Dunedin) for the last 12 years, doing high school and then heading along to the university here. Currently, you will find me at Emerson’s brewery In Dunedin, helping brew and craft the finest beverages. However, where I find my joy and passion is not in beer but in following the Lord, experiencing him deeper and becoming more like him. I love people and hearing their stories. I also have a big passion for worship and love the closeness it brings me to the Lord. I hope that I will be able to further both of these passions throughout my internship.

The reason for Africa and an NZCMS internship? Last year I felt a very strong calling that the Lord was saying I needed to surrender and give up my pride, time, skill, and money and to put him first. I’ve always loved experiencing new cultures, Africa seemed like the ideal place for this and God’s hand was on this decision.

I pray that my time in Nairobi will grow my relationship with the Lord and that I can be used to help and minister to others.

Finally, I pray that I will pass on what I learn and will be able to bring back the skills that I have gained to train and equip others. I’m really excited for what the future holds and what the Lord has in store for me.

The stories of those who come to us (Intermission – Issue 35)

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There is a need literally three metres outside the doors of our church. Every day hundreds of students walk past. So many have come so far to be here but they don’t seem to have anyone who cares about them. They fall into a world where there is only a lecture theatre, a shoebox apartment and the internet.

I’ve always admired how international students can take the risk (and expense) of leaving their home, family, friends and everything they know. They are young and come to better themselves in a place where everything is new and different – people, culture, food and even simply trying to communicate are all things they need to get used to and learn.

Sometimes the pressure can be intense. Tim, a successful Chinese honours student we know, was the only one from his village who had ever gone to university. Tim’s study cost so much and was so important that his father back home decided not to tell him he was dying of cancer. By the end of the year, it was too late and Tim’s father was gone.  The same thing happened for a dying brother of a young Iranian postgraduate student. I know an Indian student whose parents sold their house to get him here.

You get the idea of the sacrifices many make to be here in New Zealand. And you can begin to understand that there are cultures that think and do things differently to the way Kiwis do. In that difference, we can find the joy of intercultural engagement in Christ. I don’t believe Jesus is interested in us either conforming others to our image or living in our own separate worlds like marbles in a bag – in the same place but completely disconnected. I believe scripture affirms that while we are made distinctively within our own cultures, those worlds are made to overlap to the glory of God and the benefit of all.

The results of engagement

St Paul’s is a central city Auckland church, situated between two universities on one side and student accommodation blocks on the other. We tried not to overthink what we saw. We prayed and decided to find a day to open the doors of the church, invite people in and do a simple meal of soup and cheese toasties.

Our small volunteer leader’s group talked to others and the team grew. Six years after opening the doors, we have a leadership team of around 25 people from at least 8 different Auckland churches. On a normal Wednesday lunch, around 120 people come through the doors. People from China, Iran, India, Japan, Colombia, Chile, Indonesia, Nigeria, Rwanda and Russia gather to eat and meet informally. 

We always pray that we can make known the love of Jesus, whether it’s by making a sandwich, sharing a smile or letting someone know the good news. Over time, many have come into contact with a group who think Jesus is real and can be trusted in real life. Intercultural connection in Christ is not rarefied air for specialists. It is basic human kindness for those who are guests in our country. We help with CV’s, give people lifts, teach English and piano, go tramping and skiing. We make good friends. Sometimes it’s hard on the heart as most eventually return home. But some take a new faith in Jesus back with them!

Needless to say, we’ve had some pretty significant disappointments and failures along the way. But we kept going. Now, in addition to the meals we provide, around 25 people regularly come to a weekly pizza and Bible study night we run. We let people look at the Bible for themselves and ask them open questions to enable them to engage. We pray. A core group of people have put their faith in Jesus and want to grow. We are currently planning our first discipleship weekend. They will be the leaders in future.

Here are some comments I’d like to finish with. As well as love for Jesus and neighbour, I think there are some key ideas underlying what we do.

Key ideas to consider

Dignity:

The person God puts in front of me is a human being with his or her own story, loves, dreams, fears and challenges. Faltering English doesn’t change that. Let’s not treat people like children and pat them on the head simply because New Zealand is new to them.

Understanding:

I need to be patient and listen and learn to see the world through other eyes. Interaction with different cultures brings strange worlds of ideas, behaviours and foods that may initially make no sense or even repel me. It might make me impatient. But without that understanding of the other world, I will introduce someone to the saviour of only my world and culture. The real world of the one I am sharing with will remain largely untouched. If I persevere in listening to the person God has put in front of me I might be able to see past the strange symbols and concepts and come to appreciate what they understand a person to be, and how they are related to both their family and the unseen world. Finally, they may begin to let me into the dark places of their world – things that make them ashamed, anxious or despairing.

Enriching:

When I am patient and listening and understanding, I will begin to see the Lord and Saviour of the other person’s world. I will see Jesus in a new way I’d never seen before as He meets the needs and aspirations of that person. I will begin to worship and proclaim Jesus in a new and fuller way in terms I’m only just beginning to understand. The Lord will have led me into a fuller and deeper worship of Him through an intercultural engagement with someone who has become my brother or sister. That is why we need intercultural engagement. 

Exploring today’s missional issues from a variety of angles and contexts, the Intermission publication will equip you and your group to engage with God in your community and beyond. 

Each Intermission article will be uploaded periodically and can be found online at nzcms.org.nz/intermission. Alternatively, to receive the physical copy, feel free to email us at office@nzcms.org.nz or call us on 03 377 2222. 

Chelsea’s stories

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Last month we had the pleasure of hearing Chelsea speak of her time in Uganda as part of her Missions Internship with NZCMS in 2017-2018. Below is a summary of some of the stories and reflections she shared. 

An Introduction with Lucy

Chelsea’s best friend in Uganda was Lucy. Lucy has a disease which usually takes a person’s life by the age of 7. She is now 33 years old and is almost a walking miracle. However, her life isn’t exactly simple and she isn’t able to work due to her illness. Lucy was just one of many people Chelsea met in Uganda and, by the end of this story, you’ll know how powerful an impact she has had on Chelsea’s life and faith. But before we continue Lucy’s story, let’s journey through some other adventures Chelsea had through her Internship. 

Getting through the checkpoint

Chelsea sat on her ‘boda’ (motorbike taxi) as they flew down the dusty roads, flying past the endless farmlands and beautiful clouds of butterflies. Nervous energy crackled in the air as Chelsea and Nick drove towards a checkpoint. They needed to get to a village called Apaa but there was a high chance that they would be turned away at the checkpoint.

With them was a fantastic young nurse who, with a box full of medical supplies, was travelling with them to get the abandoned health clinic back up and running. The last staff member had been forced to flee because of the local conflict. The impact of this conflict has been slowly displacing thousands of the locals, most of whom are very poor and cannot afford to leave the only home they had ever known. It was very important that the nurse and supplies made it to Apaa otherwise the healthcare ramifications for the locals could be tragic.

Finally, they arrived at the checkpoint. The drivers slowed down to be checked, holding their breath and waiting for the guards to call out. However, incredibly, they noticed that the guards at the roadside were asleep! Without any challenges, the team’s boda drivers drove straight through as fast as they could.

When they arrived at the village, a woman immediately came to them, ecstatic that they were there. She had two sick children. Any other clinic was either too far away or too expensive for her to reach. As they began cleaning up the clinic talking to the locals, it was evident that the land conflict was extremely tough yet there was absolutely no way that the locals would leave unless, in their words, “They were dead”.

When the team left Apaa, they couldn’t help departing with a sense of worry for the people there, unsettled by the news they’d heard and what would become of the people in that area.

As part of here Internship, Chelsea stayed with NZCMS Mission Partners, Nick and Tessa, in their local community for two months. She said that the time she lived there was just a taster of what a Missionary’s life looked like. But it was two months of life-changing moments that consistently stretched and grew her faith. She would often find herself asking “Where is God in this situation?” or on a different day “God is so present here!”

Breaking into a refugee camp

“The worst they could do is get you arrested, and we’ll sort that out later if that happens.”

Quoting Nick’s words brought a laugh from the CMS Support Group that Chelsea was speaking at. During her time in Uganda, she wanted to visit a refugee camp, however, Nick was busy that day. Of course, he had no qualms at all about letting Chelsea loose to find her own way there!

She was warned to keep a low profile when entering the camp and to stay away from the camp authorities who might not be happy to see her there. If she was found, of course, he said she’d either be kicked out or arrested. This didn’t seem to be a big issue for him although Tessa was a bit more concerned. In the end, however, Chelsea decided she would go on her own. 

Through bodas, taxis, and hitchhiking, she eventually arrived at the camp, headed round to the back and entered (Hitchhiking is a way many Ugandans make their living and very different to hitchhiking in New Zealand).

The roads were worse than the Christchurch roads in 2011 post-earthquake. In this one refugee camp, 30,000 people were crammed into a space of dusty paths, huts and barren land, interspersed with the occasional small tree. Chelsea made friends with a young man named Richard who walked around translating for her. 

 

She learned that he was trying to save money to support his family, as his father was injured and couldn’t work. After building a farm in South Sudan, the war tore over his region and they were forced to flee and start again. He was hoping to return to South Sudan later that week because he needed to get some papers to be able to work. Chelsea never found out whether he was successful or not.

For three hours Chelsea walked around the refugee camp, meeting many people and hearing their stories. By the end of the day, when she arrived home, the impact of what she’d just seen hit her. The following is a quote from a journal entry she’d written the night she got home from the camp.

“It’s honestly been a very, very heavy day here. I’m always struggling to find hope in such a hopeless place. Tonight I just curled into a ball, and I cried. A camp of 30,000 people, sort of forgotten by the rest of the world. Why could all of this be happening? Why do some people, so full of the need for power or greed …hurt so, so many people? And what do I do…?”

That night, Chelsea returned home full of questions and wondered where hope was. Hope, however, was found in the life of her best friend, Lucy.

A Conversation with Lucy

One afternoon Lucy told Chelsea her story. At a young age, her mum died, and her dad was murdered. She then cared for and raised her two younger siblings who now did not want a relationship with her. Lucy’s story was full of grief and Chelsea specifically remembered the two of them sitting down for an entire afternoon and crying together as they talked.

However, despite all of this, Chelsea remembered hearing Lucy sweeping the compound around their huts every morning. And every morning while she worked, Lucy sang praises to God. And throughout the day, she laughed at a joke or story. Lucy’s singing helped Chelsea have hope that God could help her through anything. And her laugh proved that he was present in every situation, no matter how hopeless it seemed. 

Through Lucy, Chelsea was reminded that God was not the brokenness. And he was not the pain or grief or loneliness either. God was with those in their brokenness. And, through Lucy, Chelsea saw that God could make something beautiful out of something that was broken. That is Lucy’s story. And this is Chelsea’s. They’re both only in the beginning chapters of their lives. And sometimes their lives are not easy. But they both hold onto God because they have faith that he is the hope for all people.

Hebrews11:1

“Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.”

If you would like to know more about the Internship opportunities that NZCMS provides, we would love to hear from you. visit our Internship page at http://www.nzcms.org.nz/haerenga/ or contact us at internship@nzcms.org.nz

 

 

A nation of many colours (Intermission – Issue 35)

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I’ve always loved to draw. Even when I was a kid I would write up little comics for hours (And force my parents to read them no doubt!). For whatever reason though, I always stuck with drawing. I never picked up a paintbrush. I think it was because, at the time, painting a picture with different colours just seemed too overwhelming. And messy! Also, I never found someone to teach me how.

Most of us know that a vibrant cultural diversity has filled New Zealand. But we all seem a bit separate and ‘uninvolved’ somehow don’t we? Sure we may interact with others somewhat. Say hello. Perhaps a couple of us have a friend from a different ethnicity than our own. But what have you learned from another that has challenged the way you view the world? Has your life been forever altered through an intercultural engagement? What memories come to your mind when you try to recall working with a group of diverse nationalities engaged together in God’s work? Have you heard sermons or Bible Studies in your church from an Asian perspective? A Middle Eastern? A Western? A Pacific Islander?

If you’re like me, and if you’re honest, you will struggle to answer any of these questions with a resounding “Yes!”. And if I’m honest, sometimes I don’t even want to think of an answer. Otherwise, it means taking responsibility and possibly changing something in my life. It’s simpler just not to think about it. Easier to understand. Uncomplicated. Not as messy. A little like drawing with a pencil.

But my friends, we’re a nation of many colours. The question is what are we going to do with them? Will we continue to think and dream and create with the only colour we’ve used in the past? Or is it time to begin choosing some different shades? 

I want to learn how to pick up a brush and start painting, and I’d love for you to join me. It will be messy. And yes, it may be quite complicated. But I believe the New Zealand Church is in a unique position to create something beautiful. And I think the Holy Spirit will be more than capable of teaching us how.

NZCMS’ quarterly magazine Intermission will arrive in your mailbox in the first week of June. We’ll also upload the PDF that week to this website. Within it are some incredibly valuable articles and resources all aimed at helping us becoming an interculturally engaged church. Feel free to contact us at office@nzcms.org.nz to subscribe to our mailing list or call us on +64 03 377 2222. Also keep an eye on our “Resources Tab” for an Intercultural Engagement page. Let’s start painting!

 

Introducing Chelsea

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We’re delighted to introduce to you Chelsea, our latest NZCMS Mission Intern.

Kia Ora! I’m Chelsea and I’m super stoked to be interning with NZCMS as I prepare to head off to Africa for three months, two of those living in rural Uganda with NZCMS Mission Partners Nick and Tessa!

A little bit about me: I’m a born and raised Cantab and am in my first year of Uni. A huge passion of mine is to see people have an equal shot at life and learn how absolutely LOVED they are by God. I’m heading over to Uganda because I love travel, because I’ve always wanted to go there, for the rich culture. But the major reason for me is to challenge and grow my faith. To learn what life is like for others and learn how they remain with such strong hope and faith even in some pretty rough circumstances. So yeah I’m just super stoked to be on a journey of learning lots and lots!

Please be praying for Chelsea as she prepares for the twists and turns of the journey ahead.

Moving forward with Haerenga

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You’ll be interested to know how our Haerenga Mission Internship is progressing. Last year we evaluated and reviewed the programme, and we’ve emerged with something exciting that we hope will produce long lasting fruit. What we offered previously was good, but it wasn’t so much an internship as a ‘gap year’ programme. It’s now been reshaped as an actual mission apprenticeship, where young adults are placed under the care of an experienced Mission Partner to ‘learn the trade’ of cross-cultural mission through an integrative, hands-on experience. We hope it’ll be deeply rewarding for those who feel called overseas long-term and those God is leading to workplace mission in NZ.

We’re now recruiting interns who want to be challenged in their faith as they explore what global and local mission can look like. The Haerenga website tells all: www.missioninternship.co.nz. A promotional booklet is also available from the NZCMS office. If you know anyone who might be interested, please let them know.

Haerenga Update

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At the start of this year we announced that the Haerenga Mission Internship wouldn’t be running in 2015. At first we were quite disappointed by this, but we quickly realised that God had given us an amazing opportunity to review our internship and consider its future. After many discussions, interviews and surveys we realised that we had been trying to do two things with Haerenga: offer a gap year that focused on missional discipleship, and offer a purposeful mission internship.

As it turns out, it’s hard to offer both of these in one package. That’s why we’re launching two pathways, one focused on grass-roots missional discipleship and one focused on cross-cultural mission equipping. We’re still working out the details for the discipleship pathway, but this revised Haerenga Mission Internship will be for those a little further down the missional journey who want to seriously explore cross-cultural mission in a supportive environment. Much like an apprenticeship, interns are placed under the care of experienced missionaries and ‘learn the trade’ through a hands on, guided experience typically lasting 3 – 6 months. Interns will be equipped to live missionally within their callings, whether that’s pursuing a vocation back in NZ or a life of overseas mission.

If you know anyone who might be interested, please contact Jon (jon@nzcms.org.nz)

11.11am for Haerenga

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You’re probably well aware that our Haerenga Mission Internship isn’t running this year. Initially we were quite disappointed when we reluctantly made the decision to postpone it until 2016, but we’re come to recognize God’s hand at work. He has given us an incredible window of opportunity to review, tweak and re-launch our Internship – something we simply wouldn’t have had time to do had the internship been running this year. So praise God that he really does determine our paths as we trust in him (Proverbs 3:5).

Thus far the review has been a long and prayerful process as we’ve laid Haerenga before the Lord and asked him to lead us and place us where he wants us to be. There have been many conversations, questions, prayers, tears, wonderings and imaginings happening over the past weeks as we consider how to best serve the Church in growing up missional disciples for God’s Kingdom purposes. As we got deeper into the process of reviewing – interviews, surveys, many discussions – it felt as if we were in the midst of a deep fog, not quite sure where we should be going. But, thankfully, that fog is lifting. We are beginning to sense where God is leading us with our Haerenga Internship.

This is where you come in. Over the past few years we have had 11 young people journey with NZCMS as Haerenga interns. Will you join us this week, every day at 11:11am, praying for the future of the Haerenga Mission Internship, for the young people of New Zealand, and for strategies for engaging and equipping young Kiwis for mission?

Haerenga 2015

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The Haerenga Internship has been postponed to 2016 – there will be no team this year. The primary reason for this change is due to numbers. We are taking 2015 as a time to review the internship to better it’s vision, content, and partnerships for 2016.

Please continue to pray for Kirstin and the team as they discern God’s direction and how to best mobilise young people for mission

Haerenga Promo Video

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We’ve just release a new promotional video for our Haerenga Mission Internship. If you know anyone who may be interested in it for 2015 or beyond, share this with them!

The Haerenga Mission Internship is something unique. This isn’t just a gap year – it’s real mission! It’s a chance to step out onto the waters for yourself. So if you’re between 18 and 25 and feel drawn to mission or missional leadership, this is for you. It’ll be the most exciting, most challenging, most rewarding year of your life. Plus, thanks to Laidlaw College, in 2015 this will be NZQA accredited.

Applications for 2015 are closing soon!

Find out more at http://www.nzcms.org.nz/Haerenga

If you are a pastor or church leader we have a page dedicated to you and the questions you may have: http://www.nzcms.org.nz/haerenga/for-church-leaders/

This video can be downloaded to show in your church at https://vimeo.com/115033314