News

An Update from NZCMS Mission Partners, the Elliott Family

Posted on

For the last few months it’s felt as if we’ve been straddling two worlds. We’ve been readjusting to life in New Zealand, while still seeking to minister to the needs of the people at All Saints’ Jakarta. It has been no easy feat. But we have been sustained by God, who has shown his goodness to us again and again. We are always amazed at how God uses people to walk alongside and draw us on when we are facing new challenges.  We are so thankful for your kind messages, financial support and your prayers. We have been on quite a journey since we left ‘home’ at the end of 2018. With great sadness we wanted to write and let you know that our journey is now taking a vastly different direction to what we had hoped and dreamed. Yesterday I wrote to the Church Council to tender my resignation as Acting Vicar, and Assistant Minister of All Saints’ Anglican Church Jakarta. We have arrived at this decision through a pretty robust process of discernment with NZCMS. I’m sure you can understand that this has been an exceptionally difficult decision to make. When we left for Jakarta, we were leaving with the intention of long-term service overseas. We sold up, packed up, and shipped out. I have wrestled at length with a great desire to serve the faithful men and women of All Saints’ Jakarta in the midst of a growing sense of unease as we’ve tried to develop new ministry initiatives, by distance, in a new role (Acting Vicar rather than Associate Minister). There have been some incredible joys in the past ten months as we’ve seen God’s faithfulness to us as a family and within the parish church in a time of incredible trial. But I have also come to the realisation that my personality and style of ministry leadership is not a good fit for All Saints’ Jakarta. This reality, coupled with the uncertainty of remote ministry during a global pandemic and the pressure this places on my wife, Karen and children, William and Amelia, during this time of flux, has led us to the conclusion that the current ministry arrangement is untenable.  We’ve offered to stay on with All Saints’ until the end of this year. After that we don’t know what God has in store for us, but our sense is that basing ourselves in Nelson where we’ve got amazing support around us will be the best thing for now, God willing.  NZCMS have generously committed to supporting us until the end of March 2021 if required.  We couldn’t be more grateful for the support of Lesley our Personnel Manager who has been right there for us every step of the way, to listen, reflect and pray for and with us. The whole team at NZCMS have been absolutely stellar.  While much about this is difficult, we have not lost our heart for cross-cultural mission. It seems unlikely that we will be ‘heading out’ again any time soon, but, we want to encourage others in global mission and to be people who share the Good News of Jesus wherever we are.  In time we will be in touch with more news, but for now we would appreciate prayer in the following areas:  

Pray for All Saints’ Jakarta as they digest this tough decision. Ask God to encourage them, and prevent them from despair.  Pray that we would have wisdom about how to walk in a godly way in a time of uncertainty.  Pray that we would know God’s peace as the impact of this decision, and uncertainty about the future sinks in. Give thanks for the amazing team of supporters who walk with us (you!) and the staff of NZCMS.

Thanks you again for your partnership and support, with love Zane, Karen, William and Amelia.

Riding the Wave

Posted on
I once went surfing with some of my young people when I was a youth worker. One morning I woke up and I thought “Why not shave a handle bar moustache and go surfing with the lads?” I should have realised when I had the idea of a handle bar moustache that this was the beginning of a very bad idea. But I went ahead. The short end of the story is that I went surfing, flipped off my board and took the full force of a 10 foot long surf board straight to the face.For the weeks following, I had planned to surf waves, build relationships, and tell stories. Instead, I ended up in hospital with a bad moustache. The funny thing is, all of these things, the relationship building and storytelling, still happened! Just not how I had planned them. And I definitely wasn’t surfing any more.I recall this story because 2020 hasn’t happen as we planned either. At the start of this year we were excited for Better World 2020. This would be our second year of taking young people on radical adventures for Jesus throughout the globe and exploring the big issues of justice and faith. Then COVID19. Talk about falling off the surf board and getting smacked in the face! With all the uncertainty of the first lockdown and the unknown nature of the COVID19 pandemic Better World and the NZCMS leadership decided that the best option was to cancel Better World 2020. We spoke with our past and present participants and also made a way for them to engage in the Anglican Youth Movement here in Wellington so they could continue to engage in radical discipleship.When the thing you’re investing in or planning to roll out doesn’t go to plan it’s easy to sit there and say “Sorry folks it’s all said and done” or “Let’s just wait till the pandemic is over.” But when we decided to sit at the feet of our radical God who can overcome or use anything for Kingdom advancement, it felt only right to reimagine our program and press into the core things that Better World Gap Year stands for: adventure, growing in faith and discipleship, and going deep with young people in mission.These things are still true to what Better World is. Only now we can’t unpack these things in another country. What we can do, however, is unpack them here in Aotearoa. Being able to adjust and pivot to changing circumstances is something that we have had to rely on God for a lot in this season. Maybe if I’d done that while surfing I might not have landed in hospital. So, after two years building up this Gap Year program and with a movement of young people starting to trust and get in behind it, we asked God “What are you doing?” The fruit of this questioning is that in this season, we’ve sat at his feet and trusted in His faithfulness. We’ve also decided to pair this with enough gumption to keep going rather than throw it all away because it’s not working the way it was before.We’ve learned to be bold enough to trust in what God is doing amongst young adults here in New Zealand and continue to recognise how passionate they are about exploring the world, faith, justice and their role to play in advancing God’s Kingdom here on earth. As we’ve been riding the wave of this current environment, we continue to feel called by God to be passionate about exploring, discipling and journeying with these radically ordinary young New Zealanders as we learn what mission looks like today.  That is where Better World 2021 Aotearoa has come from. And we would love to include you in that journey.

Guy BentonNZCMS Mission Enabler

Mission Partners in Cambodia “Released” from Lockdown

Posted on

After close to six months our children are finally able to physically be back in school. Praise God!Theirs is one of the few schools in the country that is now open and this comes with some fairly strict requirements from the government. Jonathan, Aaron and Emily are still getting used to full-time mask wearing, constant hand washing, separate desks, no library and limited play time.They are into their first week back and are glad to be there but hopefully there will be an easing of the restrictions soon.Life in CambodiaSome things are open and others are still closed. All religious venues are still shut, however the malls and markets are open and most people are carrying on with life as normal. There are odd ways in which things are operating too. Karaoke bars are only allowed to open if they serve food as well (as then they are classed as restaurants, which have different rules. The big movie theaters are allowed to open but only to sell food from the snack bar, not to show movies. People have also been asked to refrain from going to beauty salons and hairdressers. All this, alongside the heavy-handed approach to schools, can lead to people being uncertain about the seriousness of the current situation.Pchum BenNo, this is not someone’s name. Rather, Pchum Ben is one of the main religious festivals in the Cambodian calendar. It is a 15 day festival where Cambodians remember their ancestors and earn merit through visiting the temples and offering food to the monks there. It’s believed that during this time, the gates of hell open, allowing tortured spirits unable to pass onto the next life to enter the land of the living. Hungry, the spirits roam the earth searching for food. If they fail to find it, it is thought they will avenge their living family members and curse them.This year the festival concludes next week and friends of ours here comment that it can feel like a spiritually dark time. Cambodian Christians are often at odds with their non-Christian families over what they should do. It can be a difficult balance between showing respect to your family but not compromising in their love for Jesus.Thank youFinally, thank you always for your thoughts and prayers. We know that even though we are far from “home” we have so many people here alongside us, supporting us. Thank you especially for the many kind messages over the last couple of months since my (Neill’s) father died. We were able to watch his funeral with no internet or power issues, and were delighted to hear the kind things said about him. We continue to miss him but thank God for his life. Please keep Mum in your prayers as she copes with life with him not in it. Blessings,Neill, Rebekah, Jonathan, Aaron and Emily. 

Neill, Rebekah and family, NZCMS Mission Partners to Cambodia

Missio Dei in the Solomon Islands

Posted on

Normally, when I get complaints about my speaking, they are of the “You spoke too long!” variety. Nearing the end of our school-year today, I delivered a short, impromptu chronicle of the year to our school community. So much has happened. I was surprised, however, to discover how difficult it was to fill my ten-minute window. How odd, I thought, walking home. And then the reason came to me this afternoon in conversation with my wife, Tess. For obvious reasons, this year has been short on big events – which usually fill school chronicles and make for interesting stories – and long on the kind of relational drama that you cannot talk about in front of everyone. “Like what happens to a family in quarantine?” Tess offered.  In past years, Trinity STM (School of Theology and Ministry) has been engaged in outward mission weekly by: – Prison visitations  – Praying for the sick in hospitals – Taking Bible studies into people’s homes – Preaching and singing in the marketplace – Reading portions of the liturgy on festival days in other villages The value of this has been unmistakable. But this year we were given something different. Stay at home. Work together daily at close quarters. See the same faces every day for weeks on end.  At the best of times this has looked like: Wake up for prayer. Go to class. Go to work session. Pray before the evening meal. Study. Sleep. Repeat.  At the worst of times it has looked like: Be annoyed by someone. Gossip about them. Be alarmed at the relational chaos that ensues. Say sorry. Repeat.  It has not been easy. But we have, like so many this year, learned some important things in the process. Outward mission, taking the Gospel to places where it has not been heard or is not yet believed, is not total mission. Outward mission can assume a dimension it should not for the Church. We can overlook the work of God that is taking place in our homes and churches among people like us who have believed the Gospel already, but who need deepening. When this happens, we pursue shoots at the expense of roots. The outward and visible replaces the subterranean. Far from preventing God’s mission this year, the coronavirus has opened up to us afresh its grandest scope. God is at work everywhere, but chiefly in the Church.    

Jonathan and Tess Hicks, NZCMS Mission Partners in the Solomon Islands

Sticking to the Mission

Posted on

Ever since the start of our nation-wide lockdown way back in March, I have often been asked two questions: “where are all the NZCMS Mission Partners currently located?” and “when is NZCMS going to start sending Mission Partners out again?” I’m writing today to provide an update, and to invite you into prayer as we look out past the shores of New Zealand. Where are our Mission Partners now?The graphic shows where our Mission Partners are currently located. Some were already in NZ in March and find themselves stuck here. Others returned to NZ for health or other reasons. Some had been accepted as Mission Partners but had not yet departed to their overseas location of service.  The majority of our Mission Partners who were overseas at the time that COVID-19 became widespread have chosen to stay on location. They face a range of difficult situations – some have very restricted lives, while others have more freedom of movement. All are seeking to be faithful in their roles and responsibilities, and discern the new opportunities that God is placing in front of them.When is NZCMS going to start sending Mission Partners again?Sending out Mission Partners globally during a pandemic requires different conversations and planning. The NZCMS staff team, with governance oversight from the NZCMS Trust Board, have put in place new processes for making decisions which take into account COVID-19 impacts on sending out Mission Partners. Recently, two Mission Partners were approved to return to location and are booked to fly out by the end of August. Godly safety For mission organisations like NZCMS, decisions around sending out Mission Partners during a global pandemic brings to the forefront questions around risk. Engaging in global mission generally requires taking on greater levels of risk in terms of personal safety. Mission Partners who serve with NZCMS accept that there is a higher chance of experiencing things like political instability, tighter finances, or lower quality of medical services on location.Furthermore, the call of Mission Partners is to live long-term in another country: to learn language, to enter another culture, and to walk alongside others in living out and proclaiming the good news of the Gospel. The loyalty to stay and serve often urges Mission Partners to be present in vulnerable situations, and to stay during difficult times alongside local partners. The reality of risk-taking in global missions is to be held in tension with the duty of care that NZCMS has for our Mission Partners. An article from the Lausanne Movement describes well the balance required between avoiding risk and embracing the inherent vulnerabilities of global mission. Both the call to leave a place of safety to serve, and the call for caution, are found within Scripture, and these values need to be held in healthy tension. The author suggests asking the following questions:1)  What is my missiology of risk? What are my deeper values and beliefs around risk-taking?2)  Am I falling into the trap of wanting to be a hero, even if, with staying, I only become a liability?3) Whose decision is it whether I leave or stay? What weight should be given to the voices of the ministry partners, the sending church, the leadership of the organisation, and the workers?4) Is it time to consider new ways of working in which the ministry is less dependent on expat presence?These are not easy questions to ask or to answer. The NZCMS staff team are committed to walking closely with our Mission Partners as we make these decisions together. I am thankful that during my time serving in Egypt, I personally faced these questions and I received invaluable support from NZCMS at that time. It is a privilege to journey alongside our Mission Partners during these times.Reminding ourselves that God is on His throne A NZ leader in global missions recently wrote his perspective on missions in this time of COVID-19. In that article he writes that as he wakes each day, he reminds himself that God is on the throne. This is a posture that I’m reminding myself to live into in these uncertain days. For an organisation with a global focus, it is challenging to continually respond to evolving global contexts, develop new policies, and support our Mission Partners who face uncertainty.  As NZCMS family, let’s keep reminding each other that God is in control. Let’s give thanks that the work of mission is not all up to us! God is conducting God’s mission. Closed borders do not stop God’s mission. The Spirit of God continues to work in the world transforming us into Christ’s likeness, and bringing God’s Kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. Thanks be to God!

Rosie Fyfe, NZCMS National Director

“People are practically running forward for prayer!” NZCMS Maori Evangelist Says

Posted on

NZCMS’ evangelist to Māori, Rev. Hauoterangi (Howard) Karaka, has been busy. During this year, and even during times of lockdown, God has opened up many opportunities to reach out to others with God’s love and to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Just in the last month, Howard has had the opportunity to lead and minister at five funerals and three unveilings (unveilings are a ceremony held one year after a person passed away).“Due to this wonderful ministry of evangelism,” Howard said, ” I have had the opportunity to lead five people to salvation on the marae and at their homes and also see six re-commitments of faith to God.”   From this group of people, six of these families are now attending the church that Howard leads, Hoani Tapu Anglican Church in Drury, South Auckland. The pews are filling! The worship has been powerful and large numbers are stepping forward for prayer every Sunday.   “If I was to describe the experience,” Howard says, “I would say many people are practically running forward for prayer!”  Howard shared about one couple who walked away from church a long time ago. Their marriage came under significant spiritual attack, and they separated for many years.   “The husband was suicidal not long after leaving the church,” Howard said. “He and his wife then separated as he turned back to drinking and anything else he thought would take away the pain. Now it is so encouraging to see them both reaching out for support, prayer, fellowship and rededicating their lives back to God and each other.”  Howard also shared that he led a gang member to the Lord during lockdown. This young man is now attending church regularly and attending a discipleship program. We invite you to continue praying for Howard and his wife Gladys as they pastorally care for and disciple those in their parish and continue the work of evangelism in South Auckland. Pray that God would continue to open springs of healing and transformation at Hoani Tapu Church and that God would open more and more opportunities for Māori to hear the Gospel.  To read more missions stories and NZCMS updates, subscribe to our fortnightly email newsletter.

Rev. Howard Karaka, Maori Evangelist

Don’t let COVID-19 Get you Blue

Posted on

The passage that has been my focus in this season is 2 Kings 6:8-23. The armies of the Arameans surround Elisha, and his servant sees an impossible situation.“Oh no, my Lord, what shall we do?” he exclaims in verse 15.This is very much the exclamation of the world around us at this time, and in a sense, we feel a bit like Elisha’s servant. Those of us in the US, UK and Latin America have been hard hit, and although New Zealand has the pandemic under control, the economic consequences are affecting us all. Yet in this scripture, Elisha has a word from the Lord for us in verse 16: “Don’t be afraid…”Perhaps, like the servant, we don’t see the purpose of this time, but God has a different perspective.Elisha prays to God to “Open his eyes Lord that he may see…” and all of a sudden, the spiritual reality is made manifest around them. The armies of the Lord had surrounded the Arameans!The State of our Mission HereIn 2019 I was asked to be in charge of mission mobilisation for Costa Rica on behalf of a Latin American wide movement, and it has been a privilege to be involved in these serious strategic conversations. Leaders all over Latin America and the World are asking “Is it the end of the Mission of God as we know it?”  Many of you know that my father, Ray Miller, has developed an online Mission Training course. His aim over the last seven years was to create a specialised Masters Degree to equip a rising generation of Latin American missionaries for the needs of an ever-changing world.Our timing could not have been better. Just before the lockdown started, we launched this Masters degree in “Intercultural Development”. This initiative fits the need of the whole continent at a time when those called to Mission cannot travel. We are also offering Masters courses in Biblical studies, leadership and counselling for local church pastors.

Andy and his family having a “Blue Day Party” during Lockdown

I am taking part as one of the students in the new Master’s degree as a guinea pig, as well as being on the development team. For this course, we will be initially targeting Mission Leaders. However, the aim is to eventually open it up to those professional graduates who are looking for biblical and missions training. We are very excited about the prospect of expansion.  What we SeeThis time is a massive opportunity for the Church. I feel like Elisha’s servant looking at the Syrian army all around them but then suddenly seeing that God’s angelic troops had them all surrounded. God is for us and is challenging the Church to open our eyes of faith!This pandemic is a massive opportunity for the Gospel into the future. It’s like the earthquakes in Canterbury. Though that season was devastating and painful, after going through it I also felt that I belonged in Christchurch and even now I consider myself much more a New Zealander since then. Currently, there is a shared experience and starting point for a conversation of depth about life and death—such a global opportunity for evangelism into the future.This is what we see:1) A rising relational movement of Kingdom-minded church and mission leaders focused on transformational co-operation and collaboration for the sake of God’s Mission.2) An increase in the capacity and reach of the Global Church as we suddenly all develop an online presence and upskill our technological connection.3) Growing dependence on God amid a financial crisis and a re-organisation of priorities towards investing in the eternal purpose of expanding the Mission of God.4) A season of preparation and online training for the church and mission leadership. To be ready to take advantages of the new opportunities that will be created when borders finally open.May the Lord open the eyes of your heart today and build up your faith to know that He is for us, may He give you creative solutions and bless you abundantly as we all partner together to expand God’s Mission from Latin America to the nations!

Andy Miller, Costa Rica

Mission Partner serves in the Philippines for 43 years

Posted on

It’s always such a joy to sit and listen to people tell stories about God’s mission and how they found themselves caught up in it.This week we bring you a video of Dianne Bayley, – recently retired Mission Partner – chatting with NZCMS’ Mission Enabler Kirstin Cant about the beginnings of her journey serving in the Philippines 43 years ago. We hope it inspires you about how God works and calls each of us so differently.Watch the video HERE.

Making a Difference

Posted on
An Overwhelming Response. I couldn’t believe my eyes! Generous folks had already overshot our fundraising target in just two days! I was somewhere between jubilation and relief. We would now be able to prepare for coronavirus properly, and provide our staff with the much needed protection that only a consistent supply of gloves, masks and disinfectant can give. I felt even better as I saw comments that donors had made which showed the incredible love people had for our staff and our work.The money is in action and has been split three ways.Lacor Hospital The majority of the money went to St. Mary’s hospital, Lacor, the largest hospital in Northern Uganda, as they hadn’t been getting support from the government. Lacor is the only hospital north of the Nile with a functional ICU equipped with eight ventilators and a solar powered oxygen plant which can supply about forty people with oxygen at one time. The money helped them with connector tubes for supplementary cylinders, oxygen saturation measuring machines and a thousand surgical gowns for the COVID-19 ward. Equipment for Lacor Hospital St. Philip’s Health Centre Much of the money also went to prepare the Diocese facilities. We bought oxygen concentrators for St. Philip’s Health Centre, and enough masks, gloves and disinfectant for all nineteen Diocese of Northern Uganda Health Centres and the four Oneday Health Centres in the Kitgum Diocese. In an economy where most people have little money, masks are insanely expensive. One Health Centre St. Peters, which is deep in the village, generates around $750 every month from patient fees. Masks alone now cost the facility $250 every month, and this will continue for some time. Thanks to you all, we’ve got enough money now to buy PPE until the end of the year, which means our amazing staff can get on with the real life saving work of curing malaria, pneumonia and diarrheal disease.Because you gave more than we expected, we were even able to give all 70 of our staff at St. Philips about $15 each to thank them for their work. This thank you letter from the centre made me well up a bit! Fuel for AmbulancesLastly, we helped out the district ambulances with fuel. These ambulances are the only way sick patients can get from the village to hospital. Under lockdown patients can’t use the normal transport of motorcycle for risk of getting beaten by the army. The district only has two ambulances for the entire area, and for about a month they had no money to fuel them. We usually fear corruption in government, but we started an account at the fuel station to ensure the money was only used for the ambulances. Among the hundreds of patients carried to hospital by these ambulances, there were about twenty from our health centres directly and almost half of them referred during the night!The Struggle ContinuesMuch stress remains, as the effects of lockdown drive an already poor population to more extreme poverty. Our staff are under pressure from their families to provide for them financially, their kids are unable to go to school and bored at home, and patients struggle to front up with the money to get care, even while our facilities are the cheapest in the region. But thanks to you all, the COVID-19 stress has been greatly relieved, our staff are protected, and they are ready to continue their incredible work.To quote the staff of St. Philip “Don’t worry about anything, instead pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for what he has done”

Nick Laing, Uganda

Ponder Anew what the Almighty can do!

Posted on
Three months ago, news media started to fill up with the rapid spread of COVID-19. We were hearing stories of over-flowing hospitals and morgues in different parts of the world. New Zealanders were filling planes to get home before airlines grounded their fleets. And in the middle of this, each of our Mission Partners – wherever they served – faced uncertainty and unpredictable situations.Just as New Zealand entered full lockdown, I sent out an email update challenging us (including myself!) to turn towards God in the midst of fear and uncertainty, and ask: “Lord, what are You doing here?” and “What new opportunities are there to extend Your Kingdom?”As I look back over what has happened with NZCMS over the past three months, I can see some answers to those questions:“I’m showing you that I miraculously provide”When I wrote the update in March, some Mission Partners who had chosen to return because of visas or pre-existing health conditions, had not been able to get flights back. We are thankful for the provision of flights for all who chose to return to New Zealand, including the unexpected provision of a seat on a private jet for one of our Mission Partner’s – a picture of God’s abundance and generosity!One family was forced to buy three sets of air tickets as the planes from their location kept being grounded. Fearful about the amount of money spent, when we sat together to look at their finances, we found that somehow their budget balanced! “I’m showing you that I still want you to bring others to know my love”We are encouraged by our Mission Partners and their commitment to service. About half of our Mission Partners remain in their communities and countries of service, with others in New Zealand temporarily.We are encouraged by people applying to serve as Mission Partners, in spite of this season of uncertainty. We are encouraged by churches continuing to support the work of global mission.“Here’s an opportunity for you to be generous – just like I am”Our Mission Partners make financial sacrifices when they are sent out to serve the global Church, and the staff team at NZCMS has a duty of care to them. Because of the generosity of the broader NZCMS community, we have in turn been able to be generous to the Mission Partners who now find themselves in New Zealand because of COVID-19.Over $10,000NZD was given through NZCMS Mission Partners Nick & Tessa Laing to support emergency needs of the Anglican health centres in northern Uganda. This has been used to buy supplies in the fight against COVID-19, to pay for transport for patients, and to contribute to critical shortages at the local Catholic hospital. One of our Mission Partners, currently in New Zealand, ran a full marathon to raise money to support vulnerable people served by their ministry in Asia. Running alongside him was the Bishop of Nelson, Steve Maina, (ex- NZCMS Director).To date, $13,785 has been given to support the urgent needs that local partners of CMS Africa are seeing in the communities they serve. When we give, we live the nature of our God who gave Christ to see us transformed. “Here’s an opportunity to do new, creative things – just like I do”Our staff saw new opportunities for innovation during this season. As we entered lockdown in NZ, along with most of our Mission Partners, we saw new opportunities to connect. Happy Hour zoom gatherings provided a platform to connect as NZCMS family, and to engage in global mission topics.These meetings continue on a monthly basis: see here for more details. “Here’s an opportunity to know that I am God”We are called to trust God in a global situation which is outside our individual control, and when our own lives have not looked as we expected in 2020. I am deeply thankful to our God, who does all things well, and to you, our NZCMS family, who have supported, given, encouraged and served in these months of change and uncertainty. Let us join together and praise the Lord our God with the words from this hymn:“Praise to the Lord, who doth prosper thy work and defend thee,Who from the heavens the streams of His mercy doth send thee.Ponder anew what the Almighty can do, who with His love doth befriend thee.”Yours in the love of Christ,Rosie Fyfe