News

A Focus on Fey’s Ministries

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“What time is your flight tomorrow?” This is a regular question from me to Féy at this time of year as she has a number of commitments with the leadership team of European Christian Mission (ECM). As you all know, NZCMS has seconded Féy and I to ECM International who work across Europe. Féy has been drafted into ECM’s leadership team, and with over 200 missionaries who work from Spain across to Ukraine, and from Ireland down to Greece she has a significant role. She has three main foci in this work (apart from what she is doing in Albania):

Féy leads a team of five people who approve and oversee ECM’s projects. At present there are around 30 projects ranging from €1000 to €150,00. 

Field Ministries Executive team – this team of three people works with country leaders to oversee the ‘on the ground’ work of ECM’s missionaries. Féy monitors Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Austria, Kosovo and Albania, and lately Greece has also become part of her portfolio. A missionary recently emailed Féy after she visited Romania to say, “Thank you so much!!  And thanks to you for your role and wisdom for our team in Romania… God bless you and Murray!  

Féy is also a member of the International Leadership Team (ILT,) which oversees ECM globally. This team meets twice a year, and last month they had their meetings in Athens, and while there they assessed some of the needs in Greece by seeing some of the Greek Evangelical Church’s ministries and their need for help. To hold the meeting in Athens was Féy’s initiative, which meant she also organised all the ministry visits. 

Leadership roles such as those Féy does are essential for the ‘coalface’ work. We cannot deny or avoid this need and good administration enhances the ‘on the ground’ work the rest of us missionaries do.

Team

Our team here in Tirana is set to grow again in the New Year. Miranda Glasbergen is Dutch and is also trained as a social worker. She will be joining our team for a two year period and has a desire to work with people on the fringe of society. She will also work with children, youth and young adults in both our church and another fellowship in our church network after doing some language study. 

After years of preparation, praying and planning, Josh and Alison (Ali) Reeve are set to join us in January/February 2018. Josh is Australian and is trained as a social worker with a special interest in working with people with special needs as well as church planting. He is in the process of finishing his PHD which will be a great blessing to the growing theological community here in Albania. Ali is from Northern Ireland and is a GP (family doctor). They plan to join our team long-term with their three small children.

Update on Church

There have been three main foci for which we have concentrated on in our work with ‘The Church of God’ where we have been for two years now; disciple making, church leadership team and mentoring. 

Disciple making is spreading to the people we are coaching into this role with the idea that they establish it as part of their church culture, and it is going well. The people we are focusing on are discipling others, and also becoming the leaders in the church, which leads into the second focus we have of helping the pastor develop a leadership team. We have had three leadership team meetings this year which have been a bit tough going but seem to be heading in the right direction. We are beginning to see a group forming who are willing to speak what they think, which is quite difficult from an ex-communist perspective where everyone  feels they should agree with the ‘leader’. 

Mentoring is going well with a couple of people because we have plenty of time with them, but not so good with the ones we do not meet with so often.

Cambodia – Teaching Opportunities Available

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Two positions are available for January 2018 and a number of positions available in August 2018.

January 2018

Primary Teacher – HOPE Siem Reap

Preschool Teacher – HOPE Phnom Penh

August 2018

Primary Teacher – HOPE Siem Reap

Librarian – HOPE Phnom Penh

Secondary Science Teacher – HOPE Siem Reap

Secondary Business Studies – HOPE Phnom Penh

Secondary English and English Literature – HOPE Siem Reap & Phnom Penh

Learning Support Coordinator – HOPE Phnom Penh

 

Interested applicants should send their CV and cover letter to recruitment@hope.edu.kh or go to www.hope.edu.kh for more information.

Cairo visit

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I am nearing the end of my studies at Trinity School for Ministry! Originally I wanted to get this degree finished as soon as possible, and then get back involved in things. However, in the first year it became clear that this time of study was much more than just head knowledge, but healing and growing in God. I have two more courses to complete this semester, my thesis is due in April, and (God willing) I will graduate in May 2018.

This year, I’ve been studying courses in Romans, Hebrew language, systematic theology, church history and pastoral care. I’m finally writing my thesis, which will focus on how a theology of the Kingdom of God speaks into the theory and practice of international development.

In July/August, I spent three weeks in Egypt leading a trip with six other students and staff from Trinity. This was a great opportunity to return to one of the places that I call home, and to bring a group of seminarians along for the ride. Some high-lights:

Organising services, music, and preaching at the English speaking congregation of All Saints Cathedral (pictured above), filling in gaps while the priest was away. Visiting ministries of the Diocese. It was great to see projects that I had been involved with funding come to fruition, such as a school for Sudanese refugee children and a medical ICU unit. After many delays, the construction of the new outpatient clinic for Harpur Memorial Hospital in Menouf began this week. The joy of seeing my “Egypt world” and “seminary world” collide. One of our group preached at an Arabic congregation on our first Sunday.  Organising a workshop on the topic of how does theology speak into community development work. This was attended by former colleagues working in refugee ministries, community centres in slum areas, hospitals, seminarians, and a priest. This happened at the invite of the Diocese Director of Development, and modelled on a format of human rights workshops in Norway that a friend had been involved with. The discussion was really good, people gave positive feedback, and it helped me to think through some aspects of what I want to write about in my thesis. One thing that felt very different was the heightened security at churches; a result of the several attacks on churches in Egypt in recent months. A Coptic priest took us around St Mark’s Coptic Cathedral, where in December 2016 a bomb killed 29 people. There was still residue from the explosion on the columns of the church, chips out of the murals of saints on the walls, and a bloodstain on the wall of the courtyard where one of the injured had leaned.

Before visiting Egypt, I visited my seminary roommate Grace and her husband in Kenya. She is an Anglican priest in the Diocese of Kirinyaga, a rural area in the foothills of Mount Kenya. She was a wonderful host and the each day was full of surprises: a 7 hour prayer meeting, speaking to orphans on the importance of education, being interviewed on the Diocese TV station, touring a tea factory… We also did a pilgrimage at the “Safari ya Biblia,”a ministry that Grace was leading before seminary. As it is not a culture where people read a lot, the idea is that groups come to visit and the guide takes them around the bible by walking around the site. It was a great visit of learning more about the Anglican Church worldwide, and understand more of Grace’s context.

Family Ministry Director

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A church in Hong Kong is presently looking for a Family Ministry Director. Resurrection Church is part of the Anglican Church in Hong Kong. It’s an English-speaking, contemporary, evangelical, Spirit-filled church serving both expatriates and locals  in beautiful Sai Kung.

They are looking for a Family Ministries Director who is theologically trained to help  develop and grow their work amongst children, youth and families, helping them to become committed followers of Christ. This role will include leading a team of volunteers, supporting and coaching them to achieve the objectives of the Family Ministry. This is a full-time position. For more information, contact mikeruth@nzcms.org.nz 

We’re All Called to Give (Issue 33)

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A wealthy businessman had just gone through a heart-wrenching divorce. Burnt out and broken, he went along to a church to try finding some solace. He was delighted when he was invited home for dinner – finally it looked like someone was going to take the time to listen to him. But he quickly discovered he’d only been invited around to hear a business proposal. He needed relationship; they just wanted his money!

When churches and ministries talk about giving, we’re often talking primarily about finances. But the fourth of our NZCMS ‘missional postures’ reminds us that giving involves far more than cash: “We’re all called to give of our time, effort, energy, money, resources and skills.”

Really, generosity is all about our heart attitude, not how many zeros are on the cheques we write. Some of the most generous people I’ve met have very little to contribute financially, but never cease giving in a host of other ways: welcoming strangers, being liberal with smiles, always being available to listen when someone needs it.

Since giving isn’t just about financial giving, this Intermission features articles that explore various dimensions of generosity: What does it mean to be generous with our time? How have cultural shifts influenced how different generations approach giving and generosity? What does it mean to give others value? And is receiving actually one of the most profound ways we can give? We hope this variety will help us see that giving includes what we do with our money, but is so much bigger than that!

Snakes in a loo

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Here in Kondoa, we have had many warm windy days and nights. Our outside hole-in-the-ground loo, which is surrounded by lean-to corrugated iron sheets, has all but blown apart. A friend espied a baby snake disappearing into the hole the other day, so it is possible its entire family lives down there! Just as well we have indoor, western-type loos too. We can even flush them sometimes! The hot season will be upon us soon, which hopefully will include lots of rain. Some villages had no harvest at all from the last ‘wet season.’

At Kondoa Bible College, we rejoice in the enthusiasm of all our students. Fourteen students began their 3-year Certificate of Theology course in August, and right now are on their mid-term break. Most of them would have preferred to keep going, battling away with their essays, which many of the staff like giving them for their mid-term assessment. There are several pastors in the group; others are catechists who hope to be ordained when they have their qualification. Two more students may be joining them after the break. The two-year course students have all eagerly taken on leadership roles in the college, which is great! They too are working well, and benefiting from the computer lessons that Peter is giving them. Their goal is to be able to write their essays on the computer.

We’re at presently applying for work permits so that we can then apply for our residence permits to be renewed. We had hoped that by now there would have been an exemption granted for us as missionaries with the Anglican church but that will be too late for us now if granted. This week has been occupied with a long journey by bus to Dar es Salaam for Peter followed by two days trying to complete our work permit applications and then a long journey back to Kondoa, interrupted by a night in Dodoma, having arrived too late to go on to Kondoa. We pray that we’ll have a positive response to our application so that we can then renew the residence permit before it expires in mid-November.

Recently Peter led both services at the church in Kondoa and fortunately did not have to preach as well. Our pastor was away at a family funeral so he had to ask for the part-time pastor and myself to cover for him. We had a time of thanksgiving as part of the service for David Pearce, who had worked in the 1990’s in Kondoa and still had many who warmly remembered him.

Over a week ago now we received news that Peter’s translated version of a book on grief has arrived in Dodoma. They are waiting for us to collect and then distribute. Thank you to all who have contributed to help this come about. It will be interesting to see what it actually looks like after all this time!

Since our last newsletter we have had several groups of visitors which involved quite a lot of travelling to different parts of the Diocese. It is quieter here at present on that front as the Bishop is away on Sabbatical leave until mid-December.  Please pray for him that he can have some refreshment while away and safety in all his travelling.

Safety on the roads is a constant challenge here. An example of that is for one of our pastors who was travelling on a bus from Arusha on Friday. He ended up in hospital after the brakes of the bus failed on a steep incline and crashed. Many were very badly injured. He escaped with cuts and bruises.

We really do appreciate your interest and sharing in our ministry here in Kondoa. We would love to hear from you too when you have opportunity. Why not leave a comment below?

Image: The current three year Bible course students.

125 years

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By Allan Anderson. 

This month we celebrate 125 years of the New Zealand branch of the Church Missionary Society. As part of this celebration the Wanganui Branch is presenting “Our Courageous Forbears,” the story of the life of the first missionaries to New Zealand at Rangihoua, at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands.

This presentation will be given by two direct descendants of one of those first families, Thomas and Jane Kendall. It was first given at the NZ Justices of the Peace Conference at Waitangi in 2014 as Thomas Kendall was our country’s first JP.

Repeated at NZCMS 200 year commemoration at Waitangi later that year, we are now privileged to present this in Wanganui on Friday 27 October at 7pm (Christ Church Anglican, Wicksteed St).

Rev Amanda Neil (4x great grand-daughter) and Laurel Gregory (5x great grand- niece) of Thomas and Jane Kendall are travelling from Christchurch as our guests to do this presentation.

This is not a fundraiser but we do have some costs to cover. Tickets are $10 for adults with students free, and can be obtained from the Anglican Parish Office in Wicksteed St or Allan & Rosemary Anderson at 3421 722.

A plate for a shared supper would be gratefully received.

The Mayor Saga Continues

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“He has arrived; he is in office.”

Excellent. Against all odds, we have everybody in the same space. Media present? Tick. Religious leaders? Tick. Mayor in his office with no known escape routes? Tick. Ready for ambush.

Since the Mayor intervened and ruined the last sachet alcohol-impounding operation, he had affectively blocked all enforcement by refusing to let his enforcement officers take part in operations. Theres a lot riding on this ambush.

Our District’s former Anglican Bishop (still an influential figure) and Muslim Sheik lead the way with a gaggle of media swarming behind them. At first, I tactically remain outside. The last time I saw the Mayor, we both lost our tempers. I waited. Then my phone rang and I was summoned inside to join the discussion. Things weren’t going well. The Mayor dodged everything, weaving in lies and half truths. His attack was threefold-

He claimed enforcement was unfairly targeting certain businessmen in the town area, and that we should be going out to the villages. This is true but justified- the main suppliers of illegal alcohol are in town! He claimed that business owners had not been properly ‘sensitized’ to the ordinance, and there should be multiple meetings hosted for business owners to have ‘input’ into implementation of the ordinance. Firstly, the news about the ordinance had already saturated the media since its launch the previous year, and business owners had already had illegal product confiscated! The time for ‘sensitization’ had clearly passed. ‘Sensitization of business owners’ is at best a delay tactic to make sure nothing happens, and at worst, an opportunity for business owners to rebel and swing things to benefit their profit focus. Most bizarrely, he claimed that the first round of impounded sachets were never actually burned, and that the big public bonfire was ‘faked.’ How on earth he thought this ridiculous claim would even help his position, I’m still not sure. Afterwards I provided the video footage and photographs to the media of the sachets being burnt.

The Mayor completely dominated the discussion. The religious leaders (who I clearly had not prepped strongly enough), folded under his pompous display of authority and importance. Too gentle, too polite, their message demanding the Mayor release his enforcement officers for operations was lost. My own attempts to ‘up the anti’ were shushed. We left, I felt deflated.

Outside, we reshaped things with the media, and managed to rework the message to make it stronger!

Despite having essentially failed in our main mission of influencing the Mayor, our ambush had an unexpected positive result. Perhaps frustrated by failed ambush, the Muslim Sheik called the District Chairman and they went on radio and thoroughly dressed down the Mayor. The District Chairman then resolved to go above the Mayor’s head, and ensure enforcement would go on, with or without the town enforcement officers. Boom.

Most of the media coverage was on local radio, but a local reporter also wrote it up on their news blog. 

Communications Job

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We’re still receiving applications for the Communications Officer job. This role is all about connecting with people who are working in all corners of the world, and ensuring that their stories are heard. It’s a unique role, and we’re looking for just the right person with both the skills and vision to take us into the future.

Applications close this Friday (October 20), so if you or someone you know might be interested, make contact today.

A job description can be downloaded by clicking here.

For more information please email Janet@nzcms.org.nz

Meet the Millers

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I (Andy) was brought up in Peru as a missionary kid during a time of persecution, which taught me that the Christian life is a great adventure! Shona felt called to be a missionary at the age of 12 after hearing the story of John Elliot’s martyrdom. We met in Spain over Easter 1999 when Shona was on a 5 day holiday and I was a student at a Madrid University. We married in London and moved to NZ in 2001, with a sense that at some stage we would be going to Latin America as missionaries.

17 years and three amazing children later, we feel God saying “Go!” In fact, Aliana (13), Jeshaiah (11) and Elías (8) set the ball rolling as they discussed their desire to learn Spanish like Daddy. God is calling us to mobilise and facilitate a rising wave of mission from Latin America. Based in Costa Rica, Shona and the kids will start off learning Spanish and Andy will travel, preaching and networking with leaders of churches and national mission organisations.

Being in Costa Rica will also mean we’ll be close to the grandparents who have been missionaries there with Latin Link over the past 15 years. It’s exciting to therefore be building on my father’s legacy!

We’re excited to join team NZCMS!