Reflections

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Stories of Hope

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When God invited me to travel to India I believe it was an invitation into His heart. To see as He does and to care, because He does.I love India. It is vibrant and pungent with aroma and colour. It is ancient and earthy, communal and spiritual. It is raw and real and pulsing with life. Relationships dominate, rather than tasks. India is the people I know.I hate India because, where I have been, there is so much pain and intense suffering and every single story stands as a testament to what is true for thousands, perhaps millions of others. This, let’s be honest, can be overwhelming. But, I guess I want to say is that I’ve come to know there is more than that. Because the invitation continues! Recently I was reading from Luke 24. Jesus had just died and despair and confusion among his followers reigned. Two of his followers were talking about this when Jesus himself joined their conversation. It took some time for the truth to be opened to them. But when they finally recognised Jesus they exclaimed “Didn’t our hearts burn within us as he talked with us along the road…”The risen Messiah was breathing real hope into the confusion, the despair and the aimless wanderings of these two men on their way to Emmaus. I almost cried, because I know that feeling, of my heart burning within me. The hope of His presence bringing a different future! And this is the stuff that matters to me.You see Jesus’ invitation is not to despair, and not to aimless confusion. His invitation may travel through these, but it has always been to see through His eyes. Eyes of hope. Real hope. Where there seems to be none. And then to love in action.The stories I want to share with you here are stories of transformation. Stories where hope has become real, one baby step at a time and where I see His Kingship touching down on earth which makes my heart burn within me. I’m not sure if, in a few paragraphs of print on a page you will be able grasp the full extent of what these stories mean to the people involved. But let’s see.These few stories I have chosen are from the work of the many dedicated Indian Christians we worked alongside as part of Emmanuel Hospital Association’s (EHA) community work.While these people all live many, many miles from New Zealand, my prayer is that they will encourage you and enable you to think about Jesus’ invitation to you, into His own heart, even be it though despair, that you would be enabled to see with hope and then to act in love. I know they would be excited to know of such impact!NITUNitu is a girl from Bihar in India. Two years ago, when she was 15,  Nitu was studying in 9th grade. She was good at her study and dreamed of becoming a teacher but extreme poverty forced her to leave school and  work in a neighbour’s field. Being a determined girl however, she re-enrolled herself, but failed her tenth grade exam. After this her father tried to arrange her marriage. The prospect of marrying a much older stranger devastated Nitu. She tried to convince her parents that she should not marry but they too were determined!Nitu heard about a girls group which had been started by the EHA project in her village. She joined the group and told her story to the group members and project staff.  Several of the members and project staff visited Nitu’s home and talked with her father about the risks involved in getting married at a young age and that child marriage is a punishable offence. Nitu’s father was unaware that what he was trying to do was illegal and that he could be imprisoned for up to 2 years and fined. He agreed that it would be best to cancel the wedding plans and for Nitu to return to school. The project supported Nitu by paying her tuition fees and she has since passed her tenth grade exam. She is working hard to fulfill her dream of becoming a teacher.THE ROSHNI SELF HELP GROUPIn a mainly tribal area of Champa district, the community had relied on agricultural work. With continuing poor rains and lack of land ownership, there were huge struggles. People were starting to migrate for work (with all the dangers involved in that) or were doing small local jobs. The EHA project working in the area helped 15 of the women form a ‘self help group’. Together they were able to identify some 5 acres of uncultivated land to use. They fenced it off to protect it from animals and worked hard, transforming it into a vegetable growing area. The project team supported by digging a bore well. Through this initiative the women appreciate the time they get to spend working with their friends. Most importantly, they are all now self employed and earning enough to support their families!MR. RAJUMr. Raju is from Fatehpur in the state of Uttar Pradesh. He has had a disability since birth and was totally dependent on his parents for all his needs. Through the EHA project he was supplied with a wheelchair that was customized for him. This enabled him to help with chores and he was able to go out with friends. His parents were relieved with the changes they saw. The project motivated him to take part in a skills training program and he learnt to repair mobile phones. He has since got work at a local phone repair shop and now also can stand and walk a little with a stick. 

Amanda, Returned Mission Partner from India

Riding the Wave

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I once went surfing with some of my young people when I was a youth worker. One morning I woke up and I thought “Why not shave a handle bar moustache and go surfing with the lads?” I should have realised when I had the idea of a handle bar moustache that this was the beginning of a very bad idea. But I went ahead. The short end of the story is that I went surfing, flipped off my board and took the full force of a 10 foot long surf board straight to the face.For the weeks following, I had planned to surf waves, build relationships, and tell stories. Instead, I ended up in hospital with a bad moustache. The funny thing is, all of these things, the relationship building and storytelling, still happened! Just not how I had planned them. And I definitely wasn’t surfing any more.I recall this story because 2020 hasn’t happen as we planned either. At the start of this year we were excited for Better World 2020. This would be our second year of taking young people on radical adventures for Jesus throughout the globe and exploring the big issues of justice and faith. Then COVID19. Talk about falling off the surf board and getting smacked in the face! With all the uncertainty of the first lockdown and the unknown nature of the COVID19 pandemic Better World and the NZCMS leadership decided that the best option was to cancel Better World 2020. We spoke with our past and present participants and also made a way for them to engage in the Anglican Youth Movement here in Wellington so they could continue to engage in radical discipleship.When the thing you’re investing in or planning to roll out doesn’t go to plan it’s easy to sit there and say “Sorry folks it’s all said and done” or “Let’s just wait till the pandemic is over.” But when we decided to sit at the feet of our radical God who can overcome or use anything for Kingdom advancement, it felt only right to reimagine our program and press into the core things that Better World Gap Year stands for: adventure, growing in faith and discipleship, and going deep with young people in mission.These things are still true to what Better World is. Only now we can’t unpack these things in another country. What we can do, however, is unpack them here in Aotearoa. Being able to adjust and pivot to changing circumstances is something that we have had to rely on God for a lot in this season. Maybe if I’d done that while surfing I might not have landed in hospital. So, after two years building up this Gap Year program and with a movement of young people starting to trust and get in behind it, we asked God “What are you doing?” The fruit of this questioning is that in this season, we’ve sat at his feet and trusted in His faithfulness. We’ve also decided to pair this with enough gumption to keep going rather than throw it all away because it’s not working the way it was before.We’ve learned to be bold enough to trust in what God is doing amongst young adults here in New Zealand and continue to recognise how passionate they are about exploring the world, faith, justice and their role to play in advancing God’s Kingdom here on earth. As we’ve been riding the wave of this current environment, we continue to feel called by God to be passionate about exploring, discipling and journeying with these radically ordinary young New Zealanders as we learn what mission looks like today.  That is where Better World 2021 Aotearoa has come from. And we would love to include you in that journey.

Guy BentonNZCMS Mission Enabler

Sticking to the Mission

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Ever since the start of our nation-wide lockdown way back in March, I have often been asked two questions: “where are all the NZCMS Mission Partners currently located?” and “when is NZCMS going to start sending Mission Partners out again?” I’m writing today to provide an update, and to invite you into prayer as we look out past the shores of New Zealand. Where are our Mission Partners now?The graphic shows where our Mission Partners are currently located. Some were already in NZ in March and find themselves stuck here. Others returned to NZ for health or other reasons. Some had been accepted as Mission Partners but had not yet departed to their overseas location of service.  The majority of our Mission Partners who were overseas at the time that COVID-19 became widespread have chosen to stay on location. They face a range of difficult situations – some have very restricted lives, while others have more freedom of movement. All are seeking to be faithful in their roles and responsibilities, and discern the new opportunities that God is placing in front of them.When is NZCMS going to start sending Mission Partners again?Sending out Mission Partners globally during a pandemic requires different conversations and planning. The NZCMS staff team, with governance oversight from the NZCMS Trust Board, have put in place new processes for making decisions which take into account COVID-19 impacts on sending out Mission Partners. Recently, two Mission Partners were approved to return to location and are booked to fly out by the end of August. Godly safety For mission organisations like NZCMS, decisions around sending out Mission Partners during a global pandemic brings to the forefront questions around risk. Engaging in global mission generally requires taking on greater levels of risk in terms of personal safety. Mission Partners who serve with NZCMS accept that there is a higher chance of experiencing things like political instability, tighter finances, or lower quality of medical services on location.Furthermore, the call of Mission Partners is to live long-term in another country: to learn language, to enter another culture, and to walk alongside others in living out and proclaiming the good news of the Gospel. The loyalty to stay and serve often urges Mission Partners to be present in vulnerable situations, and to stay during difficult times alongside local partners. The reality of risk-taking in global missions is to be held in tension with the duty of care that NZCMS has for our Mission Partners. An article from the Lausanne Movement describes well the balance required between avoiding risk and embracing the inherent vulnerabilities of global mission. Both the call to leave a place of safety to serve, and the call for caution, are found within Scripture, and these values need to be held in healthy tension. The author suggests asking the following questions:1)  What is my missiology of risk? What are my deeper values and beliefs around risk-taking?2)  Am I falling into the trap of wanting to be a hero, even if, with staying, I only become a liability?3) Whose decision is it whether I leave or stay? What weight should be given to the voices of the ministry partners, the sending church, the leadership of the organisation, and the workers?4) Is it time to consider new ways of working in which the ministry is less dependent on expat presence?These are not easy questions to ask or to answer. The NZCMS staff team are committed to walking closely with our Mission Partners as we make these decisions together. I am thankful that during my time serving in Egypt, I personally faced these questions and I received invaluable support from NZCMS at that time. It is a privilege to journey alongside our Mission Partners during these times.Reminding ourselves that God is on His throne A NZ leader in global missions recently wrote his perspective on missions in this time of COVID-19. In that article he writes that as he wakes each day, he reminds himself that God is on the throne. This is a posture that I’m reminding myself to live into in these uncertain days. For an organisation with a global focus, it is challenging to continually respond to evolving global contexts, develop new policies, and support our Mission Partners who face uncertainty.  As NZCMS family, let’s keep reminding each other that God is in control. Let’s give thanks that the work of mission is not all up to us! God is conducting God’s mission. Closed borders do not stop God’s mission. The Spirit of God continues to work in the world transforming us into Christ’s likeness, and bringing God’s Kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. Thanks be to God!

Rosie Fyfe, NZCMS National Director

Mission Partner serves in the Philippines for 43 years

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It’s always such a joy to sit and listen to people tell stories about God’s mission and how they found themselves caught up in it.This week we bring you a video of Dianne Bayley, – recently retired Mission Partner – chatting with NZCMS’ Mission Enabler Kirstin Cant about the beginnings of her journey serving in the Philippines 43 years ago. We hope it inspires you about how God works and calls each of us so differently.Watch the video HERE.

Changing Places in Changing Times

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In this story, we hear from our Mission Partner John and how he and his family chose to respond to their unexpected evacuation. We also share a video from one our Mission Partners for prayer, and don’t miss an important update of NZCMS family news at the bottom of this email.Responding to Times of ChangeBeing an evacuee has not exactly been something I had on my bucket list. And though the country my family and I we were in had a fairly severe lockdown, my thought was “Well, evacuation is a pretty strong word. It’ll never happen to us.” Needless to say, it was a shock when our course suddenly changed and we quickly found ourselves being evacuated to Europe, sitting on a Qatar Airways charter flight with the airline staff dressed in hazmat gear.Response vs ReactIt’s a unique time for humanity, where all of us find ourselves caught up in a global mess with no clear solutions, answers or pathways forward. Each and every one of us has been forced to react to what’s happening.And that’s what we’ve seen: a lot of reacting. Panic buying. Anger. Blaming. Protests. Counter-protests. Anti-counter-protests. Instinctive, emotive, knee-jerk reacting has been hard to avoid.But I believe, in times like this, God actually calls us to respond rather than react. To pause and, from a posture of trust, lift our hands to heaven and ask how should we act in this present moment? Responding isn’t to deny the reality we find ourselves in; it’s simply to recognise that we always exist within a much greater reality, God’s reality, and to think, process, decide, feel and imagine from within God’s reality rather than ours.Put differently, it’s easy to get caught off-guard by all the things that are no longer possible, and as a result we can miss the new opportunities that are in front of us. The pandemic has absolutely disrupted life as usual, but it’s also opened doors that we had previously missed, and even created new ones.There are a good number of people, families and organisations who have faced the reality of our current situation and asked “What do we need to change?”. They’ve found a way to pivot and to hold onto their vision, purpose and calling and make whatever changes are needed to continue forwards.What has been our response to this?While we were still in Asia we found ourselves unable to do pretty much anything we were there to do. But as it turned out, because everyone else in Asia was facing more or less the same thing, we realised that we could start running our trainings online from Europe. After all, everyone else was also stuck at home!Within a month, we were able to offer training to around 100 people and were quickly adapting our methods for online platforms. And what’s more, because we’re now thinking in a different way, we discovered that the potential reach from our humble home office is actually huge, in spite of it being hundreds of miles away!As a result of this, though our vision is the same as it was before, it feels like the pipe-dream that we originally had of influencing and empowering leaders right across Asia, is actually possible!We have new tools, new strategies, new partners, and even new dreams, all which will still carry that vision forward in far better ways than before. Rather than merely hunkering down, we chose to respond rather than react and therefore discovered opportunities we previously couldn’t see.My family and I have decided to embrace the stressful, scary unknown and take some pretty real risks. We’re still in the middle of the unknown and have basically no idea what the future holds. But we’ll keep trying to change, respond and lean into God as best as we can.So what’s God placing in front of you, and how are you responding?John,NZCMS Mission Partner to Asia

Ponder Anew what the Almighty can do!

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Three months ago, news media started to fill up with the rapid spread of COVID-19. We were hearing stories of over-flowing hospitals and morgues in different parts of the world. New Zealanders were filling planes to get home before airlines grounded their fleets. And in the middle of this, each of our Mission Partners – wherever they served – faced uncertainty and unpredictable situations.Just as New Zealand entered full lockdown, I sent out an email update challenging us (including myself!) to turn towards God in the midst of fear and uncertainty, and ask: “Lord, what are You doing here?” and “What new opportunities are there to extend Your Kingdom?”As I look back over what has happened with NZCMS over the past three months, I can see some answers to those questions:“I’m showing you that I miraculously provide”When I wrote the update in March, some Mission Partners who had chosen to return because of visas or pre-existing health conditions, had not been able to get flights back. We are thankful for the provision of flights for all who chose to return to New Zealand, including the unexpected provision of a seat on a private jet for one of our Mission Partner’s – a picture of God’s abundance and generosity!One family was forced to buy three sets of air tickets as the planes from their location kept being grounded. Fearful about the amount of money spent, when we sat together to look at their finances, we found that somehow their budget balanced! “I’m showing you that I still want you to bring others to know my love”We are encouraged by our Mission Partners and their commitment to service. About half of our Mission Partners remain in their communities and countries of service, with others in New Zealand temporarily.We are encouraged by people applying to serve as Mission Partners, in spite of this season of uncertainty. We are encouraged by churches continuing to support the work of global mission.“Here’s an opportunity for you to be generous – just like I am”Our Mission Partners make financial sacrifices when they are sent out to serve the global Church, and the staff team at NZCMS has a duty of care to them. Because of the generosity of the broader NZCMS community, we have in turn been able to be generous to the Mission Partners who now find themselves in New Zealand because of COVID-19.Over $10,000NZD was given through NZCMS Mission Partners Nick & Tessa Laing to support emergency needs of the Anglican health centres in northern Uganda. This has been used to buy supplies in the fight against COVID-19, to pay for transport for patients, and to contribute to critical shortages at the local Catholic hospital. One of our Mission Partners, currently in New Zealand, ran a full marathon to raise money to support vulnerable people served by their ministry in Asia. Running alongside him was the Bishop of Nelson, Steve Maina, (ex- NZCMS Director).To date, $13,785 has been given to support the urgent needs that local partners of CMS Africa are seeing in the communities they serve. When we give, we live the nature of our God who gave Christ to see us transformed. “Here’s an opportunity to do new, creative things – just like I do”Our staff saw new opportunities for innovation during this season. As we entered lockdown in NZ, along with most of our Mission Partners, we saw new opportunities to connect. Happy Hour zoom gatherings provided a platform to connect as NZCMS family, and to engage in global mission topics.These meetings continue on a monthly basis: see here for more details. “Here’s an opportunity to know that I am God”We are called to trust God in a global situation which is outside our individual control, and when our own lives have not looked as we expected in 2020. I am deeply thankful to our God, who does all things well, and to you, our NZCMS family, who have supported, given, encouraged and served in these months of change and uncertainty. Let us join together and praise the Lord our God with the words from this hymn:“Praise to the Lord, who doth prosper thy work and defend thee,Who from the heavens the streams of His mercy doth send thee.Ponder anew what the Almighty can do, who with His love doth befriend thee.”Yours in the love of Christ,Rosie Fyfe  

God at Work in the Ordinary

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Hearing for the First TimeWe gather together at the end of the day, sitting on grey plastic chairs, our open Bibles illuminated by one solar light. I look around at my sisters in Christ, women from different language groups, representing diverse cultures yet together nonetheless to share in the hearing of the Gospel.We start with a few praise choruses accompanied by an eight-string hand-made ukulele. After a brief prayer of thanksgiving, we open our Pidgin English Bibles to The Sermon on the Mount. As I begin to read aloud, they turn toward me, attuned to the words of Christ: Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. As we meditate upon and discuss the text around our circle, the words of Scripture come alive in the tropical evening.As a missionary in the Solomon Islands, a chain of islands in the South Pacific, it is my joy to work with my husband as teachers at an Anglican Seminary. The enrolled students are all men and many of them bring their wives and families to the school for their last two years of study. Their wives are then able to join the Women’s Ministry Program, which equips them to partner with their husbands.All but one of my women students have only a primary level education, and on average they finished formal education after the fourth grade (approx age 10). They struggle with feelings of inferiority and ineptitude when it comes to studying anything, especially the Bible, a realm that they are more than happy to leave to their soon-to-be ordained husbands.However, it is a beautiful thing to behold these women, despite their fears and insecurities, showing up every Monday night and opening themselves up to hearing the precious word of God. Many of them are unable to read fluently, so instead they open their ears to let the Gospel in. Their attitudes represent what it means to be poor in spirit, in a place of emptiness and need at the feet of Jesus. Most of the time, they are hearing the words being read for the very first time.Listening WellIn an oral culture, listening is a far more practiced art than the act of reading. Sometimes I am shocked when someone repeats back to me something I said in a context where I thought nobody was listening.At feasts, when important guests are given a turn at the microphone for a speech, I look around at the crowds of people sitting around in the shade of fruit trees, eating roasted pig, sweet potato and fish. Most of them seem oblivious to the man talking. Many of them are even talking loudly amongst themselves, chewing and spitting betel nut, barely even looking at the speaker. But rather than not paying attention, these men, women, and children are actually tuned in and could tell you exactly what was said if you asked them afterwards.When Jesus went up on that hill overlooking the Sea of Galilee and sat to teach the crowds, I’m guessing it was a very similar scene to the Solomon Islanders sitting around at a feast. Over the din of playing children, squabbles between siblings and chitchat, those Israelites had their ears tuned in to hear the Master’s words. They were the very first ones to hear what we as modern Christians have the privilege of reading again and again.Poor in SpiritAround our little circle of chairs, we read Jesus’ words to those who would hear and open their hearts to the transforming power of the Gospel: Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.Those who are poor in spirit are those who do not think highly of themselves, but rather come to Christ ready to be filled with his Holy Spirit. Men and women who are poor in spirit will see God’s will be done here on earth, as it is in heaven. They will get a glimpse of what is yet to come.The women in my Bible Study are hearing the Word of God in clear Pidgin English for the first time and are soaking it all in. One of my students has said to me several times, “Before, I just heard the words being read from the Bible. But now I can actually understand them!”Reading together in a common language is making the Word alive to them. As I said farewell to a woman leaving the school yesterday, she tearfully told me that when she came to the school, she came with an “empty heart.” She continued by saying that she had learned so much, especially about the Bible through our classes and Bible Study.These women have never had access to Bible Study guides, inspirational Christian books, topical studies or video teachings. Instead, they sit in dim light, holding an open Bible, allowing the Light of the World to shine on them and show them the path of discipleship.What about us?We as Western Christians can’t fake poverty. No matter how hard we try to simplify and reduce the clutter of our physical lives, the fact still remains that we are privileged to have a wealth of knowledge at our fingertips. So how can we become “poor in spirit” when we are just too rich in comparison to our brothers and sisters in the 2/3 World?When the rich young ruler comes to Jesus in the Gospel of Mark and asks how he can enter the kingdom of heaven, Jesus tells him to sell everything he owns and give it to the poor before following him. The young man leaves downcast and bereft, knowing all to well that his heart and very life are set upon his wealth and that he is not willing to give that all up for the sake of following this Saviour.Where do our hearts lie? For many of us, our status, education and wealth are dearer to us than the voice of Jesus. We are like the rich young ruler in this story. “How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of heaven” (Mark 10:23). While he could not make the choice to follow Christ, we can! When the disciples ask Jesus in dismay, “Who then can be saved?” (Mark 10:26) Jesus lovingly responds, “With man this is impossible, but not with God; all things are possible with God” – Mark 10:27.We can make the choice to follow Christ, to hear his voice in the Scriptures and to come to our Heavenly Father as children with empty hands and supple hearts.Simplify for a SeasonI recently met a retired missionary pastor who was reminiscing about how many books he had owned at the height of his ministry. As he prepared each Sunday Sermon, he would pore over numerous translations, commentaries and other Christian texts in an effort to get to the heart of the passage that he was going to preach to his congregation. Upon his retirement, he sold his entire library to a budding seminarian.He thought he would dearly miss his faithful leather-bound companions, yet what he found was quite the opposite. He was delighted by the simplicity of reading a passage of scripture and allowing the words to seep into his heart, mind and spirit. He still preaches occasionally and an NIV Study Bible is his only resource. He has found freedom in dwelling deeply in the Word of God.What if we were to set aside our books, study guides and other devotional materials for a season and simply allow the Word of God to speak to us? Take a week or month, to de-clutter your devotional library and focus solely on the Bible. Join together with millions of brothers and sisters around the world who hunger and thirst for righteousness and find real food and drink in the pages of Scripture.Look at it as a spiritual fast. When the noise of the words and opinions of others are quieted for a while, perhaps we are able to hear afresh what God wants us to hear.Refocused and RenewedWhen you return from your time of fasting, you will have fresh eyes and ears. You will have feasted on the Word and found how it feels to be “poor in spirit.” As you reintroduce other books and materials to your reading, you will be able to better discern those resources that nurture your love for God’s voice and those that distract you. Just as you might return from a physical fast to face a plethora of tempting food choices, you will have feasted on what is good and necessary and know which things you can live without. Let’s be more interested in what the Bible says than what others say the Bible says.Come to Jesus in his Word as beloved children, setting your gaze upon him and opening your empty hands towards him to be filled to overflowing.

Tess Hicks, Solomon Islands

Listening and Growing in Partnership

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Tēnā koutou te kāhui ā te Atua,Greetings to all God’s people. Kāhore he Hūrai, kāhore he Kariki, kāhore he pononga, kāhore he rangatira, kāhore he tane, wahine rānei; he tangata kotahi tonu hoki koutou katoa i roto i a Karaiti Īhu.There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. (Galatians 3:28) This Sunday marks Te Pouhere in the Anglican church calendar, which celebrates our life as a three Tikanga Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.  What is Te Pouhere and Why Was it Formed?What is the meaning of Te Pouhere? The Māori word ‘Pou’ is translated ‘post’ and the Māori word ‘here’ is translated ‘bind’. Te Pouhere is a revised constitution established in 1992, which provides an opportunity for each of the three partners to express their tikanga – their way, style, or cultural model. These three partners are Tikanga Māori, Tikanga Pākehā and Tikanga Pasefika. They are to express their minds as equal partners in the decision-making process of the General Synod and to exercise mission and ministry to God’s people within the culture of each partner.For Māori, the 1857 constitution and the 1992 revised constitution has not been truly honoured in terms of partnership and resource sharing. However, in recent times we have seen that there have been some promising steps that we are working towards in achieving an equal partnership. Below are some examples of the turning of the tide.Te Pouhere in Te Takiwā o ManukauMission and Ministry Continues Under Lockdown The Māori ministry team has been blessed to continue proclaiming the Gospel throughout this period of lockdown in New Zealand through the use of live-streaming networks and media platforms. From the 24th of May 2020, Howard Karaka – fellow Evangelist to Māori with NZCMS – along with Archdeacon Lyndon Drake and myself (Keri-Ann Hokianga), have started offering a weekly 30-minute worship service called “Karakia Rātapu” onto Radio Waatea here in Auckland. We collaborate with our Pākehā brothers from the Christian Broadcasting Association who use their resources to pre-record the service for us. They have also created a podcast for the service and we are so blessed that they’re using their gifts to help us proclaim the word of God in our context. We are receiving communication from some un-churched people who are now subscribing to our podcast and letting us know that they will be listening every Sunday. Praise be to God!This has been made possible by the grace of God through Te Rangapū (Partnership) between Te Takiwā o Manukau, the Christian Broadcasting Association, and Radio Waatea.Te Pouhere in the Context of Māori EvangelismThe roots of the Gospel being shared in Aotearoa began through friendship and partnership. At Oihi Bay on Christmas Day in 1814, Reverend Samuel Marsden from CMS preached from Luke 2:10, with Ngā Puhi chief Ruatara translated into Te Reo Māori. This partnership to preach the Gospel message began a journey of many Māori being converted to Christianity and this continued to grow as Māori became pivotal evangelists to their own people. The pattern of this partnership between Rev. Samuel Marsden and Chief Ruatara to effectively spread the Good News of Jesus Christ here in Aotearoa is still being realised today. Praise God that I am one of two Māori Evangelists to partner with NZCMS in 2020, proclaiming the Gospel to our nation. God is doing a powerful and wonderful thing and we are so excited to be part of His plan as we work together. Keri-Ann is one of NZCMS’ Mission Partners evangelising to Maori. Click the photo of Keri-Ann below to learn more about her life and ministry.

Keri-Ann Hokianga, NZCMS Maori Evangelist

The Borderless Bubble-Popping Body of Christ

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Life in New Zealand is starting to feel more normal for many of us. Recent months have been hard, especially for those who have lost jobs, but there is also a strange sense of normality – we can visit cafes, go shopping, and gather at church. However, there is also a sense of disjuncture knowing that even as life goes on here, in many countries COVID19 is causing untold a suffering.What does it mean to be part of the global Church at this time? This question stirs us. In our church calendar this week we celebrate Trinity Sunday. We are reminded of the community of love in God’s own being: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. This is a relationship and community that extends beyond the Trinity to include us – the Church. Like the God in whose image we are made, our identity is communal. As a member of the global Church we are part of the one body of Christ. This is language that we are used to hearing, and it has become very familiar. But the implications of living into this reality are radical.When we are baptised, we become united with Christ and we become a member of Christ’s body, the Church. At baptism, this membership becomes our primary identity: “for in one Spirit, we were all baptised into one body – Jews or Greeks, slaves or free, and all were made to drink of one Spirit” (1 Cor 12:13). Our identity as a Christian, part of the body of Christ, comes before our nationality or any other human marker of identity. We are ultimately citizens of the Kingdom of God and this identity comes before what’s written in our passport.Another implication of our membership as Christ’s body is “if one member suffers, all suffer together.” (1 Cor 12:26). When I wrote funding proposals for development projects in a previous role, it was common to use language such as ‘beneficiaries,’ or ‘developing countries’ that signifies the otherness of those in need. These designations, which categorise humans into ‘us and them’ are ultimately invalid in the Kingdom of God. There is no ‘us and them’: there is only one body. We are to experience the suffering of our Christian brothers and sisters like it is in our own body.As members of the global Church, we do not have the option of sheltering ourselves in a safe New Zealand bubble and forgetting the rest of the world. We are called to live into our membership of the global Church, a body with Jesus Christ as our head.At a missions conference last year, I sat at the same table and prayed with Bisoke from Bunia in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Tess Hicks, one of our Mission Partners serving in the Solomon Islands. Recently, I shared with Tess messages from Bisoke about the situation in Bunia, and she immediately wrote back asking how to give. This is what it looks like to live as the body of Christ: to live out this metaphor in our actions.As a family with a heart for global mission, NZCMS intentionally looks out and engages with the global Church. New Zealand is facing an economic recession, and we know that NGOs like us will face financial challenges. At the same time, we want to not only look to our own interests, but also to the interests of others (Phil 2:4).In this context, I want to share with you some needs from our CMS counterparts in Africa. NZCMS is part of a global CMS network – we are sister societies who seek to support and learn from each other.The director of CMS Africa, Canon Moses Bushendich, shared with me recently the needs that their local partners are seeing and responding to. He writes:“Many states have instituted lockdowns in response to Covid19 without capability to support those who live on daily wages. Many people have lost their jobs, a means of survival. Pastors in churches cannot get paid because congregations cannot meet and raise the usual offertory. Many families have a real threat of hunger.Several communities, especially in Northern Uganda, have been suffering drought the last few months and when the rains came, there were fresh invasions of desert locusts that are ravaging crops.In Bunia, DR Congo, Local Partner Bisoke has sent distress calls over war and killing that has hit him closely. Conflict has displaced 400 families coming to his peace centre for refuge. Normally food for the centre comes from the surrounding villages, but now there is no food coming which means that life is so hard. More children are developing malnutrition.Images coming from Kivu Province in DR Congo show floods with many feared dead and hundreds displaced from homes. Our CMS Africa Local Partners are on the frontline all over the continent calling for prayer, for practical relief, and supporting efforts to alleviate suffering.”It hurts us to read and hear this account of our body suffering; it’s overwhelming, and it challenges our own sense of comfort and safety. Together we are brought to our knees in prayer as we bring our concerns before a loving, present, and redeeming God. We pray that God would show us how we can be the hands and feet in this world at this time, with whatever we find in our hands.  We invite you to continue to pray for our brothers and sisters around the globe who are experiencing so many devastating challenges. We also invite you to consider how you might offer what resources you have to the global Church.Relational Relief GivingWe are opening an appeal for giving to CMS Africa’s Local Partners who can distribute shopping vouchers to families in need.Here is how a small amount can make a big difference: One shopping voucher worth KEs 2,500 (Approx $40NZD) buys basic food and sanitation needs for a household of 6 people for 1 month.Directions for how to give:– Go to the “What would you like to support?” drop down menu – Select “Other”– Go to the section”Name of Mission Partner or Project”– Type “CMS Africa Appeal”As a member of Christ’s body, we are on a journey of learning what our identity as citizens of God’s Kingdom looks like in this Covid19 world. We pray that God would continue to teach us what it means to suffer, reach out, give, receive, and see beyond our own borders. As we live into the reality of ‘one body and one Spirit,’ we ask God to shape our hearts and to be ever-transformed into the likeness of the triune God. Your sister in Christ,

Rosie Fyfe, NZCMS National Director

There is Purpose in the Waiting

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After Jesus was raised from the dead, he spent forty days with his disciples. During this time he proved to them that he was alive and spoke to them about the Kingdom of God (Acts 1:3-4). What an incredible time this must have been! Jesus “opened their minds so they could understand the Scriptures”. They were finally getting all the answers to the questions they’d had for the past three years of Jesus’ ministry.When eating with them one night, Jesus suddenly says “do not leave Jerusalem, but wait for the gift my Father promised, which you have heard me speak about.” The disciples respond “are you going to restore the Kingdom to Israel now?”.But Jesus again tells them to wait, saying “…and you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you…”.  And, as the Church remembered this week, Christ then ascends to heaven.What would it have felt like to be one of the disciples? Perhaps after hearing years of teaching about the Kingdom of God, and witnessing signs of the Kingdom, they felt ready to do the work. But, then they’re told to wait. To not preach the Gospel. Not pray for people. Not make themselves public. Do nothing. Stay where they are. And wait.The Fruit of Faithful WaitingIn the Gospel accounts, the disciples continually wanted to ‘do something’. They wanted to extend God’s Kingdom. They wanted to change the world! Their lives and perspectives were ruled by action and seeing societal transformation. And that is not inherently a bad thing. But at this crucial transition point, Jesus told them not to do anything, no matter how good they thought their ‘doing’ was. Incredibly, this waiting culminated in a powerful moment in church history. In fact it led to the very birth of the church! And what happened next was exactly what was needed for the Gospel to create transformation: God showing up and empowering them in a way that was completely different to what they had ever experienced before.The result of the disciples’ faithful waiting and obedience to Jesus was the tangible, experiential power of the Holy Spirit. The fruit of their faithful waiting was the formation of the Church. The fruit of their waiting was, ultimately, the transformation of the world.The Inside Impact of WaitingWhy did Jesus ask the disciples to wait before sending the Holy Spirit?Of course, let’s be clear, their waiting did not somehow ‘qualify’ them to receive God’s blessing. Earning the Holy Spirit denies everything Jesus’ death and resurrection accomplished. But rather, perhaps the natural by-product of the disciples’ faithful waiting was that the very shape of their hearts were transformed into vessels that could receive what God wanted to give them. And it was through their faithful, obedient, surrendered waiting that they were able to receive it. What we can do while WaitingOver these last few weeks we’ve all done a lot of waiting here in Aotearoa. We, like the disciples waiting in the Upper Room, have been holed up in a house waiting for change, and not knowing what might come next. But now our country is beginning to get ‘active’ again. Shops are opening. Alert levels are lifting. Church small groups are meeting. ‘Stuff’ can start happening again. And it’s exciting.However, during this time, I’ve been blessed to be a part of the NZCMS staff who, in amongst all the various tasks and roles that we still must complete, haven’t rushed off to do what we’ve always done before. But we have been using this time to ask each other questions such as:“What are the new opportunities that are available now?”“What will cross-cultural mission look like in the future?”“What is the prophetic call of God to the Church right now?”The disciples weren’t asked to wait when things weren’t possible. Jesus asked them to wait when they could have started preaching the Gospel. And now we find ourselves in a similar space. Our alert levels are dropping. But I believe that now is the most important time for the New Zealand Church to wait on God.The temptation is so strong to just ‘go back to normal’. But what if, now, God is not calling us to rush back into doing what we’ve done in the past but to wait on him and be open to seeing the ‘new things’ that He wants to birth in us and the Church? Maybe now is a good time for all of us to lay our strategies, tasks, and attitudes before the feet of Jesus, surrender them to Him and ask for the Holy Spirit to speak. Because, I believe God takes our willingness to give Him our ‘doing’, and turns it into the gift of an obedient heart, more fully able to live and serve in His power to achieve His mission of bringing God’s kingdom to earth. If only we would just wait for a while.

Jairus Robb

NZCMS Communications