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A Japanese Connection


Did you know that the very first NZCMS Mission Partner, Marie Pasley, went to Japan as early as 1893?

“Miss Pasley was farewelled on her departure for training at Dr Warren’s Institution in Melbourne, with a view to working in heathen lands”(i)   

“Her's was a most faithful ministry, chiefly among women and children” (ii)

Miss Pasley served in Gifu and Hamada, from 1893 until her retirement in 1922. She died in October 1942.

And did you know that now, 128 years later, Luke and Naomi Sinclair are preparing for ministry there?

Japan has been on their hearts for a long time. Naomi lived there with her Australian CMS missionary parents from the age of two until returning to Australia for university. Luke studied Japanese at high school and went on an exchange there at the end of Year 11. When they two met and married at Bible College, they saw how God had shaped and prepared them to head to Japan in the future.

What an amazing God we have, orchestrating the circumstances and preparing the way for other Mission Partners to influence young people in Japan. Luke and Naomi will partner with the KGK (Kirisutosha-Gakusei-Kai), Christian Students’ Fellowship, encouraging Bible study on campus and training students, labouring to see the next generation of Christian leaders raised up in Japan.

Former Mission Partner, Anne McCormick, has put this story together. Anne is currently serving NZCMS by sorting through our archives.

(i)  Nelson Church Recorder, July 1st, 1892

(ii) “Stretching Out Continually” by Kenneth Gregory, p. 131.



Members of the Japan Church Missionary Conference, 1894.

6 thoughts on “A Japanese Connection

  1. Archivist’s update! In the photo accompanying this post, Marie Pasley is seated on the ground in the light coloured jacket and Miss Hunter-Brown (who was also sent out by CMS around the same time ) is seated straight behind her.

    1. Thank you, Anne, archivist extraordinaire! We have updated the feature photo to highlight Marie Pasley. What a great piece of history!

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